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Women at Work

The Gag Tactic Wall Street Taught Silicon Valley

Legal barriers for women in tech have grown, thanks to some bi-coastal knowledge sharing

New Yorker on Why Tech Has a Gender Discrimination Problem

Yesterday, Sheelah Kolhatkar, released her piece for this week's New Yorker that digs into why gender disparity is so prevalent in tech. It's a juicy read, and I'm a big Sheelah fan. I ate up her book Black Edge last winter that looked into how hedge funds ultimately get away with insider trading. I urge you to read Sheelah's entire story - it's long but worth it. In the meantime, I'm highlighting one of the more revelatory parts that details why it's so hard for women in tech to speak up about the discriminatory practices they witness.

"...in recent years in Silicon Valley there has been an enormous increase in the use of arbitration clauses in employee contracts—a legal strategy pioneered by Wall Street firms..."

The paragraph I lifted the above quote from follows and you can read Sheelah Kolhatkar's entire piece here.


"Meanwhile, the tech industry continues to erect barriers to legal action. A recent study by the law firm Carlton Fields Jorden Burt found that in recent years in Silicon Valley there has been an enormous increase in the use of arbitration clauses in employee contracts—a legal strategy pioneered by Wall Street firms, whereby disputes such as harassment must be settled through arbitration rather than litigated in federal court. The arbitration process is both shielded from public scrutiny and generally considered more favorable to employers. Tech companies have also embraced the use of employee confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements. Ostensibly, such agreements exist to protect company secrets, but when they are too broad they prevent employees from comparing salaries or talking publicly about their experiences at work. One former Google employee told me, "I wish we could have a twenty-four-hour moratorium on N.D.A.s, because that day would rock the tech industry."


Work-Life Integration

8 Questions to Ask Yourself to Determine If You’re Burning Out—And What to Do If You Are

I thought about writing this blog piece like one of those quizzes that used to be on the back pages of Seventeen and Cosmo where each question would offer several answers of varying point levels and you'd pick one answer per question, tally up your points at the end, and match your score to one of several possible results.

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Surescripts, LLC

Applying & Interviewing at Surescripts — Technical Recruiter Michelle Baker Shares Her Tips

Meet Michelle Baker, a technical recruiter at Surescripts. She shared her top tips for applying to Surescripts.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the company's interview process, culture, and values, and learn how you can best prepare for interviews!

To learn more about Surescripts and their open roles, click here.

For Employers

How Leaders Can Support Their Black Employees

A five-step framework for addressing systematic racism at work

The world has changed in the past few weeks.

We're watching corporations and organizations across the world come out in support of Black lives in droves. Many of those organizations are doing so for the first time in their history.

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Career Advice

How Viasat’s Jasmine Harvey Architects Her Own Career

Jasmine Harvey is pursuing her MBA while working full-time as a buyer for Viasat, a global communications and satellite internet company. Balancing home, work, and school while maintaining a 3.9 grade point average has been quite a challenge. Jasmine had a perfect 4.0 until she took one of the hardest classes in her program, Managerial Economics and Global, during this COVID pandemic. She finished a full 15 percentage points above the class average, but was still 0.6 points away from an "A".

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Career Advice

How CSL's Kristen Krebs Applies Her Psychology PhD at a Biotech Leader

If you had asked Kristen Krebs what her dream job was when she was studying for her PhD in Industrial/Organizational psychology at DePaul, she might not have known exactly what title to give, but she would've described a role within a thoughtful organization where she got to make people's work experiences more positive, build a team with talented people, and feel connected to an overall mission.
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