×
Create a Free Profile on PowerToFly
Exclusive event invitations with hiring managers, live chats with female thought leaders and the latest remote, flexible and in office roles at companies committed to creating more diverse and inclusive workplaces.
GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
Women at Work

The Gag Tactic Wall Street Taught Silicon Valley

Legal barriers for women in tech have grown, thanks to some bi-coastal knowledge sharing

New Yorker on Why Tech Has a Gender Discrimination Problem

Yesterday, Sheelah Kolhatkar, released her piece for this week's New Yorker that digs into why gender disparity is so prevalent in tech. It's a juicy read, and I'm a big Sheelah fan. I ate up her book Black Edge last winter that looked into how hedge funds ultimately get away with insider trading. I urge you to read Sheelah's entire story - it's long but worth it. In the meantime, I'm highlighting one of the more revelatory parts that details why it's so hard for women in tech to speak up about the discriminatory practices they witness.

"...in recent years in Silicon Valley there has been an enormous increase in the use of arbitration clauses in employee contracts—a legal strategy pioneered by Wall Street firms..."

The paragraph I lifted the above quote from follows and you can read Sheelah Kolhatkar's entire piece here.


"Meanwhile, the tech industry continues to erect barriers to legal action. A recent study by the law firm Carlton Fields Jorden Burt found that in recent years in Silicon Valley there has been an enormous increase in the use of arbitration clauses in employee contracts—a legal strategy pioneered by Wall Street firms, whereby disputes such as harassment must be settled through arbitration rather than litigated in federal court. The arbitration process is both shielded from public scrutiny and generally considered more favorable to employers. Tech companies have also embraced the use of employee confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements. Ostensibly, such agreements exist to protect company secrets, but when they are too broad they prevent employees from comparing salaries or talking publicly about their experiences at work. One former Google employee told me, "I wish we could have a twenty-four-hour moratorium on N.D.A.s, because that day would rock the tech industry."


Career Advice

What Does a Chief Customer Officer Do?

A Q&A with Gainsight COO and Customer Success Thought Leader Allison Pickens

If you've ever wondered what a Chief Customer Officer (CCO) does, you're not alone.

READ MORE Show less
Career Advice

Debunking the Myths of Code -Video Games

Computer Scientist & Video Game Entrepreneur Ursula Wolz Shares Tips for Women Game Developers

A few weeks ago, we kicked off a new chat-and-learn series: Debunking the Myths of Code, led by Ursula Wolz, a video game entrepreneur and academic with over 40 years of experience.

READ MORE Show less
Symantec

How To Celebrate Pride at Work

What These 11 Companies Are Doing to Celebrate Pride & Support The LGBTQ+ Community

With Pride Month in full swing, we wanted to take a moment to celebrate the LGBTQ+ communities at PowerToFly and our partner companies.

Here's how 11 of our partner companies are fostering inclusivity and celebrating Pride - this month, and all year round.

READ MORE Show less
Inspiration

The Problem With "Boys Will Be Boys"

How It Ends Up Hurting Women And Men

The phrase "boys will be boys" makes my blood boil. But I realized when I sat down to write this piece that I didn't know exactly why.

READ MORE Show less
Loading...
© Rebelmouse 2019