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Women at Work

This Company Cares About Gender Intelligence: Spotlight on adidas

When you think of adidas you probably think of sports, right? Women in tech, not so much…let alone an entire initiative on Gender Intelligence. Time to meet Amy Wick, the newly implanted senior director of U.S. product operations at adidas, who was sent to the company’s headquarters in Germany recently for a unique new program on Gender Intelligence, or understanding the differences between men and women and how they make decisions, solve problems, and communicate.  It was there that she learned about her current position in product operations via a circle of female mentors who encouraged her to throw her hat in the ring.


The opportunities adidas have given me are tremendous and I am so thankful. The people, the legacy.  I won’t forget that they gave me this chance and I intend to pay it forward.”

Though Amy has been working for the company for 15 years, she began her whole new professional path on the product operations team after serving at the intersection of business solutions and IT for well over a decade. She even moved across the country from Massachusetts to Oregon to pursue this new experience. Although trepidatious about the change at first, the support of those at adidas around her proved to be the ultimate impetus.

“IT wasn’t what I studied in college and I didn’t want to be stale in my thinking or in my approach to my job. I left my team ready. The team was ready to step up. Everyone has their own journey. It’s always worth trying something. In fact, this position I’m in now - my current manager is also female, and the two people who held this role before me were also women. Strong female leaders who I aspire to be like.”

Along with her growing career, Amy discussed how her views on gender in the workplace have evolved. “Education on gender is absolutely necessary in the workplace. We can be so biased without even knowing it,“ says Amy. “The more we talk about it and acknowledge it is really important. I’m glad adidas has recognized it and put a team in place. Hopefully in the future we won’t even have to talk about it.“

As a kid, I didn’t consider gender as an obstacle,” Amy continues. “I was raised to work hard, but that was a bit naive on my part. What’s important is to talk about gender and biases and to talk about masculine or feminine traits. The Gender Intelligence program is critical to adidas’ growth in the future. It’s a sustainable way to keep us going.”

With all that adidas has given her and others, personally and professionally, Amy wouldn’t dream of working anywhere else.

I live in the moment, and this is exactly where I need to be right now. “

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That makes celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (which was named a month-long celebration in May by Congress in 1992 "to coincide with two important milestones in Asian/Pacific American history: the arrival in the United States of the first Japanese immigrants on May 7, 1843 and contributions of Chinese workers to the building of the transcontinental railroad, completed May 10, 1869") this year all the more important.

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Emma started her career in the world of telecommunications, moving from IC to team manager, then to contract positions when she had her children and needed flexible scheduling. Now in her current role as an Engineering Manager at payment platform Afterpay, Emma continues to find ways to manage her personal and professional growth, and her family's well-being.

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5 Things All Product Managers Should Do for Their Engineers (And Vice Versa)

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"There are an extensive amount of things that have to go perfectly at the same time," says the former engineer (and current product manager at live event ticketing platform SeatGeek).

It was that interest in understanding how things actually worked that drove Anuja to study engineering—first electrical, during her undergrad in India, and then computer science, during her master's program in the U.S.

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The Secrets to Balancing Work and Family Life

3 Pieces of Advice from Working Moms at Pluralsight

Being fully committed to work and family is a challenge that many working parents have to take on. It can be exhausting and thankless pursuing a fulfilling full-time career, while taking an active role as a parent. Achieving a healthy balance can help keep you motivated and productive at work, while allowing you to be fully present when you're home.

We recently chatted with working moms at technology skills platform, Pluralsight, about their best advice for striking that elusive work-life balance. Here were their key points:

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