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Kargo

From Kargo's Senior Interactive Designer: "Five Mobile Design Best Practices"

Below is an article originally written by Melyssa Cramer, Senior Interactive Designer at PowerToFly Partner Kargo, and published on October 11, 2018. Go to Kargo's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

The mobile landscape is ever-evolving, but our core best practices have remained constant for our award-winning design team at Kargo. Follow along below for our top five mobile design principles to see how we keep our units looking as fresh as the latest Yeezys.

1. Contrasting Colors

Utilize contrasting colors for the most important information within the ad.

While we want color palettes to be cohesive, choosing a contrasting color for interactive elements within a mobile ad is important to attract user attention to the desired action. When determining call-to-action button colors, select a color that pops against the background content. Users will be able to clearly identify the call-to-action and will be more likely to engage.

2. Easy to Engage

Keep interactive elements within reach of a user's navigation finger for easier engagement.

According to a 2017 study* by Steve Hoober, a mobile UX expert, 75% of people only use one thumb to interact with their phone screen. Keep this in mind when choosing the layout for interactive elements of your design. The biggest "hotspots" on a mobile device are in the middle or near the bottom of the screen. Primary functions, such as swiping through a product carousel for engagement, should be kept near the middle of the screen, while secondary functions, such as tapping a call-to-action button for CTR, should be kept near the bottom of the screen. This ensures that the user is easily able to interact with the unit without frustration.

*https://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2017/03/design-for-fingers-touch-and-people-part-1.php

Link: https://s3.amazonaws.com/kargo.com/wp-content/uplo...

3. Beautiful Imagery

Use bold, beautiful imagery to drive home our value of keeping "art in ad tech."

Space limitations on mobile devices require marketers to be more strategic about the way they populate the ad canvas. At Kargo, we strive for all of our units to include very clear product or lifestyle imagery to help draw users in, especially for our in-article placements. With text-heavy articles and the quick-scrolling nature of mobile device use today, users are more likely to notice a beautiful, bold image versus an ad full of lengthy blocks of text. This visual stimulation acts as a contrast against the site content – this theory is the basis behind our Key Art product, which relies on very little messaging, allowing the imagery to tell the brand story.

Link: https://s3.amazonaws.com/kargo.com/wp-content/uplo...

4. Less is More

Focus your creative around the most important elements and get rid of the extra fuss.

Similar to the previous best practice around beautiful imagery, Kargo is a big proponent for "less is more." Space is constrained on mobile devices, so layout becomes even more crucial when designing your ad. While it may be enticing to cram in every bit of info as you can, this could actually detract from the overall message & negatively impact user engagement. We advise having one main line of messaging, the headline, with limited supplemental copy. Pair this with one primary focal-point product image and a very clear call-to-action, and you have a recipe for success.

5. Animated vs. Static

Draw in user attention by the use of motion.

While beautiful imagery & concise messaging can capture attention, the best way to further engage your audience is by the use of animation. Using movement & unique transitions helps give the finished product a premium feel and aids in drawing the user deeper into the experience. Go one step further and incorporate user-controlled scroll-reactivity, which can boost in-view time by up to 25%.

Link: https://s3.amazonaws.com/kargo.com/wp-content/uplo...

Stand with Kargo and stand out against the clutter of on mobile screens. Incorporating these best practices into your creatives will captivate your user base and entice them to engage.

popular

The Best High-Paying Remote Jobs

5 full-time work-from-home roles that pay seriously well

We—we being the internet in general, as well as PowerToFly specifically—often talk about remote work as this glorious thing: you can find professional fulfillment, friendly co-workers, and career growth potential from the comfort of your own home. All while collecting a check!

But where should you look if you want that check to be as big as possible?

Start with this guide to the best high-paying remote jobs. These career choices (and the example companies hiring for them) don't skimp out on paying remote workers well, and you'll still get all the work-from-home flexibility you're looking for. I've linked to specific job posts for each category below, but also look through the 300+ remote jobs on PowerToFly's always-updated remote job board for more.

As you apply and interview, keep these work-from-home interview questions in mind. If you find yourself with a salary offer that's good, but not quite as good as it could be, reference these salary negotiation tips for remote workers to advocate for what you deserve. And when you get the job with a great salary, make sure your home office is set up for success. And then send me a note to tell me how you're doing!

1. Senior Software Engineer

Business woman using laptop

Who It's Good For: Anyone who's a pro in programming languages (Java, Javascript, C++, Python, and SQL, to start, among others) and knows how to drive the development of products. If you like complex engineering challenges, have experience working with different systems and products, and have the discipline to program without a PM physically hovering over you (Slack hovering's allowed, though), this is for you.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Sr. Principal Software Engineer at Dell, Senior Front End Software Engineer at Plectica, Senior Software Engineer at CloudBees

Why You Can Do It Remotely: Like most heads-down-and-create work, developing software and programming are best done with minimal distractions. You'll collaborate with your team for check-ins and bug fixes, but you'll be able to focus on your project work from a home office.

Average Annual Salary: $131,875

2. User Experience Researcher Manager

Young adult woman working with laptop at mobile app

Who It's Good For: Proven researchers who know how to understand the behaviors and motivations of customers through feedback and observation, who have experience synthesizing insights into a brand story, and who have managed teams.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Senior Research Operations Program Manager at Zapier.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: As UX researcher Lindsey Redinger explains in her helpful Medium post, remote research allows companies to reach users all over the world, not just within driving distance to their headquarters, and can be cheaper for companies and easier for participants.

Average Annual Salary: $105,810

3. Senior Product Designer

Female graphic designer smiling at desk in office

Who It's Good For: Creatives with technical chops who like the challenges of evolving and improving the production of current products, leading designers, and collaborating with other parts of the business.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Senior Product Designer at SeatGeek.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: While design teams definitely need to share lots of feedback, there's technology out there to make that easy. The Help Scout design team has shared their favorite tools and tricks to collaborate remotely, which includes recording daily videos of new designs to explain features and ideas in a way a photo file just can't express. (They're also hiring! Check out open Help Scout jobs here).

Average Annual Salary: $107,555

4. Senior Security Analyst

Developing Concentrated programmer reading computer codes Development Website design and coding technologies.

Who It's Good For: Thoughtful, vigilant thinkers who enjoy identifying and fixing gaps in a company's security posture, including through ethnical hacking (hacking a company's system before outsiders can, and addressing the weak points found) and incident response (containing the negative effects of a system breach or attack).

Sound Like You? Check Out: Data Protection Security Analyst at Deloitte.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: Not all security analyst positions are remote-friendly; sometimes they require working with very sensitive data that can be compromised if taken off-site or accessed from a VPN. But with the right data processing policies—like using a privacy filter over your laptop, only using secured wifi, and encrypting your data, all suggested by WebARX security's all-remote team—remote work as a security analyst is definitely possible.

Average Annual Salary: $108,463

5. Technical Project Manager

A strong wifi connection makes for a strong relationship

Who It's Good For: Tech-friendly jack-of-all-trades with a sweet spot for spreadsheets and other organization tools.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Technical Project Manager at Avaaz.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: Project management can sometimes be like herding cats, but you don't need to be in the same room as your feline team members in order to direct them around. With collaborative software (and a highly organized home office, like PM pro Patrice Embry recommends), you can PM the most complicated of projects from wherever you're located.

Average Annual Salary: $95,129

Other Industries

Other high-paying remote-friendly jobs include certain roles in healthcare (like nurse practitioners and psychologists, who can check in with patients via video conferencing and phone calls), app developers for both iOS and Android products, actuaries and tax accountants, and data scientists.

And remember that even jobs that don't seem remote-friendly at first, could possibly be done from home or on the road. If you find a well-paying, exciting job that doesn't offer remote work immediately, it might be worth negotiating a more flexible schedule with a 1-2 day work-from-home option. Both you and the company can see what remote work actually looks like in action, and if it goes well, you can make a pitch to transition to remote work full time.

Other resources you may want to check out in your quest for meaningful, well-paid remote work:

6 Programs You Should Download Right Now if You Work Remotely

Productivity Tips for Remote Workers

Home Office Design Tips for Remote Workers

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Build Your Network at the Next PowerToFly Event

Today we celebrate our partnership with Braintree! Check out this video to see highlights from our recent networking event.

If you missed the event, fear not! Stay connected by following Braintree on PowerToFly and email us at Hi@PowerToFly.com for future events near you.

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