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Mindbody

From A MINDBODY Employee: How To Support Your Transgender Employees

Below is an article originally written by Tammy Cravit at PowerToFly Partner MINDBODY. Go to MINDBODY's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

MINDBODY's Core Values are an integral part of what makes it an amazing place to work. Our values and our culture are important to many of our employees. As a transgender woman, MINDBODY's values and our culture of inclusivity and diversity are especially important to me. Although lesbian and gay rights advocates have made huge strides in civil rights in the past two decades, the transgender community is still very much misunderstood and marginalized. Being out and visible remains a vulnerable experience, and I've definitely encountered prejudice in the workplace in the past.

That hasn't been a problem, though, at MINDBODY. When I started here, my supervisors told me, "Diversity is the lifeblood of any successful organization." Everyone I work with, including our CEO Rick, has been unconditionally supportive of me, and I know our other LGBT employees are similarly supported.

When MINDBODY says we're "leveraging technology to improve the wellness of the world," there's no doubt in my mind that the LGBT community is affirmatively and enthusiastically included.

So how do you as a business owner support your transgender employees? Here are a few of the ways MINDBODY has supported my journey:

  • Pay attention to culture. MINDBODY's culture and our focus on our Core Values act to discourage prejudice—but what's more, our culture and values tend to be attractive to diverse, open-minded, supportive people. Create a culture where everyone—male and female, straight and gay, cisgender and transgender—can thrive, and you'll have a happy, supportive, productive workforce.
  • Make inclusivity and diversity a priority. It's easy for people to go with what's safe, familiar and comfortable. If you make diversity in hiring and promotion a priority, you make space in your team for great people, no matter what their identity. You create a welcoming, supportive culture for everyone—and that can only benefit your business.
  • Create safe space for change. When a transgender employee undergoes a change of gender, her or his friends, family and co-workers are necessarily along for the ride. Creating a supportive environment for those transitions—where people use the employee's preferred name and pronouns, where communication about the employee's transition is respectful, and where the employee can feel comfortable even during the "in-between" period of transition, is essential.
  • Make sure your benefits cover all employees' health and wellness needs. Some (but not all) transgender employees choose to undergo psychological, medical and/or surgical procedures to conform their bodies to their internal gender identities. You can support them by providing benefits coverage for these procedures, and by working with them to make their journey through the healthcare bureaucracy as smooth and frictionless as possible.
  • Focus on the whole person. My identity as a transgender woman is an important aspect of who I am, but it's far from the only aspect of my life. Remember that each of your employees is a whole and complete individual, and support them in whatever journeys of growth they undergo.
  • Zero tolerance for intolerance. This should go without saying, but prejudice, bigotry and harassment have no place in an inclusive workplace. Set the expectation from your top management downward that such behavior is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Then follow through.

These tips will help make a better, more inclusive experience for your transgender employees. But more than that, creating a diverse, inclusive nurturing workplace is better for all the people who work in it.

Webinars

Elevating Black Women Virtual Summit: Learn more about Our Partners, Sponsors & Speakers

Learn more about our amazing speakers and sponsors at our April 2021 virtual summit Diversity Reboot: Elevating Black Women, three days of conversations and panels plus an interactive virtual career fair.

From everyone here at PowerToFly we want to extend a BIG thank you to everyone who tuned into last week's Diversity Reboot: Elevating Black Women. In case you missed a talk or you'd like to revisit one of our great conversations, don't worry, all of the fireside chats and panels will be available to watch for free on PowerToFly soon.

We were thrilled to present conversations on such important subjects as the racial wealth gap, the importance of affordable child care, how BIPOC youth are leading the way on combatting the climate crisis, the importance of black women in entrepreneurship and business, being an ally for communities outside of your own, plus tech talks, fireside chats with Black woman founders, panels with DEI leaders and much more.

We want to extend a HUGE thanks to our amazing sponsors MINDBODY, Smartsheet, NGA, Procore Technologies, S&P Global, PayPal and PwC whose support made this event possible.

Finally, don't forget to visit our Merch Store and grab yourself some PowerToFly apparel. 100% of the proceeds from our sales will be going to TransTech Social, supporting transgender people in tech.

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