GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
Uber

Uber Corporate Change: Bo Young Lee

Below is an article originally written by PowerToFly Partner Uber, and published on August 29, 2018. Go to Uber's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Bo Young Lee is dedicating herself to making everyone heard at Uber because she knows what it feels like to be a fish out of water. As Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, she's working to create a culture where every person is capable of achieving their full potential. Although Bo is relatively new to Uber, she has been helping companies move forward for decades.

"I'm bilingual, but not in the traditional sense," says Bo. "My personal background and my professional experience have put me in a place where I can advocate for others while working shoulder to shoulder with people who have traditionally benefited from historical power structures."

Bo studied management consulting at the University of Michigan, seemingly working toward a traditional career in business, but it was her penchant for practicing yoga and veganism that made her stand out.

"Finance was a bro culture before tech had one," Bo says. "I recognized that the environment wasn't made for people like me, so I surprised all my professors by going into nonprofit work to advocate for others. Now this topic of diversity and inclusion is roiling companies. I realize I was just a bit ahead of the curve—and this is a relatively new conversation for tech companies."

At Uber, Bo views the conversation as a way to fundamentally recognize how companies naturally structure themselves into a hierarchy, and as a way to recognize and support employees so that everyone who works at Uber can be their full, authentic selves.

Internally, the company is making progress, having created a Diversity Advisory Council to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging initiatives. The council is made up of employees and industry leaders, all of whom offer their perspectives and guidance on both strategy and specific changes to implement. Uber also has Employee Resource Groups—support and inclusion groups for employees of all backgrounds and beliefs that have executive team sponsors for more visibility and support.

In addition, last year Uber announced a fund to support organizations that work to bring more women and underrepresented people into tech, including BUILD, Code.org, Girls Who Code, Iridescent, and SMASH.

But to really move Uber forward, Bo says, the company has to make good choices and recognize that great work and ideas can come from every individual. When Bo started her career, she wasn't the typical business student or finance worker, and now that diversity is an important conversation for a lot of industries, her experiences and background can set up others for success.

"We tend to think of diversity in very categorical terms—gay, straight, men, women, race, religion, and so on. I want to expand that view. I'm a very multilayered individual—I'm female, I'm a first-generation immigrant from Korea, I grew up in New York, went to school in Michigan, and now I'm working for a Silicon Valley tech company," Bo says. "And a lot of people have backgrounds that are just as complex. But if we're going to create a service that provides transportation to the world, we need to create an internal culture that reflects the diversity of the world."

Career Advice

Salary Negotiation Tips for Remote Workers

You're in the late stages of interviews for a remote job—congratulations! But negotiating a salary is already hard enough. How do you do it as a remote worker who won't be positioned in the same place as the company?

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Career Advice

How To Lose A Job In One Sentence

This is a harsh post. So why am I writing it? Because I've seen way too many people make this mistake recently.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Inspiration

How to Get Back to Work After a Career Break

6 Tips to Get Hired After a Hiatus

In my mid-20s I developed a brain tumor that needed to be surgically removed (7 years tumor free today, woo hoo!). After recovering from brain surgery and realizing that the job I had may have been a contributor to my stress, I took a hiatus from working to concentrate on finding myself.

After discovering what really made me happy (making bagels from scratch) and what made me not so happy (how I felt after eating a ton of bagels from scratch), and my savings started to dwindle, I decided I needed to figure out how to get back to work after my career break.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less

Guidelines for Following Up By Email After an Interview

So you've finally had the interview you were waiting for, and now you want to know the best way to follow up. Enter the thank you email. You should send a follow-up email thanking your interviewer(s) and reiterating your interest in the position. In this article, we'll review guidelines for following up by email after an interview.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Loading...
© Rebelmouse 2019