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Slack Technologies Inc

Setting New Hires Up For Success

Speed up onboarding with these integrations for Slack

Below is an article originally written by PowerToFly Partner Slack, and published via Medium on June 7th, 2018. Go to Slack's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

While a well-equipped desk with a new laptop and a coffee mug might make for a nice introduction, it's how you prepare employees for their new position that matters most. "Faster onboarding means employees can more quickly do the jobs they were brought on to do," says a recent IDC research study, sponsored by Slack, that also finds that HR teams using Slack for employee onboarding are able to get people up to speed on their new jobs 24% faster.

Getting new hires fully briefed and trained up can be a lengthy process. By connecting various tools with Slack, you can run an effective and organized onboarding program that gives new employees immediate access to the tools and information they need to make a roaring head start.

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For Employers

LinkedIn Diversity Report Omits Photos of Black People

Don't just say you're going to feature underrepresented minorities, actually do it !

I sat down this afternoon to read LinkedIn's newly released 2017 Diversity Talent Report. Midway through, after seeing a number of fascinating stats LinkedIn had gleaned from its massive database, I started to notice a glaring omission. For a report about diversity, there were no photos of black people. To gut check myself, I sent the report to my team at PowerToFly and they confirmed what I wasn't seeing. They also pointed out that Asian, White and Southeast Asian women seemed to be the predominant faces in the photos LinkedIn picked.

LinkedIn clearly took the time to choose diverse subjects for its images - they just didn't take enough time to check if they were leaving out American's largest racial minority - African Americans. The omission is particularly strange if you consider the great advice LinkedIn includes in the report around building inclusive environments where everyone can feel they belong. One of the action points LinkedIn suggests is to:

Highlight diverse models of successful leadership. Show women there is more than one route to the top. Point to role models and discuss how she can build on her own strengths, skills, and priorities.

This action item is rooted in research that shows how much women, especially in STEM, want to know how people who look like them are succeeding at a company.


The overall lesson here is follow LinkedIn's advice when building out content and diversity initiatives for your company - the report is a recommended read. But learn from their mistake - don't just say you're going to feature underrepresented minorities, actually do it!

So you don't have to go through the entire report, I've added all the images below.









For Employers

Hiring For Diverse Talent: Your Holiday Reading List

One of our Senior Sales Executives at PowerToFly pulled together a "holiday reading list" for our partners filled with a number of articles I've been meaning to catch up on. Since the next two days should be relatively quiet on the work front - and crazy on the home front - I'm sharing this list. Perhaps you can steal away from the stuffing for a few minutes to read these insights.


1. “Numbers Take Us Only So Far” by Maxine Williams, Facebook's Global Head of Diversity and Inclusion

Read the article here

I interviewed Maxine over a year ago for Business Insider. You can watch the video here where I was riveted by how she's set up inclusion trainings as part of Facebook's on-boarding process. In her recent article for Harvard Business Review, Maxine makes the argument that we need to expand how we collect diversity data.

"...data volume alone won't give leaders the insight they need to increase diversity in their organizations. They must also take a closer look at the individuals from underrepresented groups who work for them—those who barely register on the analytics radar."

2. The Programs At Top Companies To Move Women Out of Middle-Management: WSJ

An interesting read from the Wall Street Journal that showcases what IBM, Chevron and Intuit are doing to give women the support they need to ultimately arrive at the C Suite. Why?

The share of women in middle management was unchanged at 33% and rose slightly in C-suite roles to 20%, concludes a new study by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Co.


3. Competing For Talent in The Digital Age: A CEB Report

Read the report here

A quick read that reinforces the work we're doing at PowerToFly by taking a market driven, analytics approach to finding under-represented but over messaged women in tech, sales and digital.

Candidates are a recognized stakeholder in the hiring process. This status is driven by scarcity in some sectors as well as candidate expectations. Organizations are learning to build in interactive touch points that mirror the candidates' journey and allow candidates to explore and evaluate the role and the organization while informing candidates' decision to commit to a full application.

Message me @kzaleski on Twitter or via my LinkedIn profile here if you have more suggestions for our holiday reading list at PowerToFly.

And Happy Turkey Day

Giphy

Better Companies

The Problem with Sexual Harassment Training

Hint: it protects companies more than potential victims

On Friday, Jena McGregor at The Washington Post published an analysis on why sexual harassment training programs that surged in the late 1990s, after two Supreme Court decisions, have done little to create more inclusive workplaces for women.

The best quote from McGregor's article that sums up why sexual harassment training is flawed is below. As Debra Katz simply says, these trainings are viewed as band aids that provide cover, but don't get to the root of changing a company's culture to prevent conditions where harassers feel empowered.

"It was sort of a get-out-of-jail-free card to companies," said Debra Katz, a Washington lawyer who represents plaintiffs in sexual harassment cases. After the 1998 decisions, she said, "there was like a cottage industry of trainers who went in and provided training. Most of those efforts were geared toward trying to protect themselves from liability as opposed to creating a sea change in the culture."

McGregor's article is filled with more possible reasons, including research that shows how sexual harassment trainings reinforced gender biases through materials that made women look like they had less power at organizations. Another fun fact from McGregor's piece is that only "five states have a mandate for harassment training for private and public employees (another 22 require it for some or all public-sector workers), according to the National Women's Law Center." Sexual harassment training is not nearly as prevalent as assumed.

So what can we do beyond pushing for broad cultural changes across corporations? That's a larger conversation that I'll break down in future blogs. In the meantime, watch Claire from HR cut to the core in a SNL skit below. She provides the best sexual harassment training I've seen to date (and no, that isn't a joke).

Claire from HR's Sexual Harassment Training


More articles on why sexual harassment training falls short:

Washington Post: What's the point of sexual harassment training? Often, to protect employers.

Bloomberg: Why Can't We Stop Sexual Harassment Training at Work?

CNN: Paul Ryan Orders Mandatory Sexual Harassment Training for Members, Staff

Women at Work

943 Disparities Under Law Inhibit Women Economically

That's what the World Bank says

There are so many reasons why there are fewer women than men in the workforce (and if you want to look at workplace gender disparity in the United States relative to the rest of the world, then read my post from earlier in the week). The reasons we hear the most in the US are often the most insulting ones to women. How many times has someone shrugged and told you that there are fewer women working at the top of companies than men because "women drop out"?

Blaming women for not conforming to workplaces that were never built for them in the first place is an easy out for anyone who refuses to look at the structural barriers women face - especially when major barriers are written into the laws of your land.

The World Bank's Women, Business, and the Law report lists 943 gender-based disparities that prohibit women from some type of economic participation. In France, a first-world country, women are not allowed to work in professions where they would need to lift about twenty-five pounds. Yes, twenty-five pounds.

You can read the entire Women, Business, and the Law report here and dig into how each country discriminates against women. As Rachel Vogelstein and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon write in their excellent Building Inclusive Economies report:

"an overwhelming 90 percent of the 173 economies surveyed [by the World Bank] have at least one legal policy that inhibits women's economic participation...
...One hundred economies around the world limit the occupations and sectors in which women can be employed. These limits include restrictions on the hours women are permitted to work and the types of jobs they are allowed to hold. Not only do these barriers reduce the pool of qualified candidates but they also contribute to the confinement of women to low-paying jobs, as many of the more gender regulated industries—such as mining and manufacturing—are relatively higher paying."

Scroll to page 236 to see the specific section on the U.S. You'll see that gender-based disparities in law preventing women from certain jobs in US aren't as prevalent as in Saudi Arabia, for example, but we do lack legal mandates around paid leave that directly affect women's participation in the workforce.

"943 gender-based disparities under the law still inhibit women’s economic opportunity worldwide" - CFR

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