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What The Pregnancy Gym & The Wing Say About Investing in Women

Two articles about women-only organizations popped into my feed today and struck me for one reason: businesses that cater to 50 percent of the global population - women - are raising money, or at least considered viable enough for some form of funding. This sounds exclusionary, but think of all the startups that serve the male demo. The list is long.

The Wing, a women's only co-working space that also feels like a club with lots of millennial pink and great programming, announced it raised a $32 million B round led by WeWork (clearly a potential acquirer). And Fast Company wrote today about a gym dedicated to pregnant women called FPC (no details of how it has been funded were disclosed).

When we started PowerToFly in 2014 and then raised a $7.5 A Round, one of the most frequent questions we got from Venture Capitalists was whether we'd expand the platform to include men. Our answer was simple: "any gender is welcome to join PowerToFly, but we're focusing now on fixing a giant problem that currently affects over fifty percent of the population. Marketing to men would distract from our current mission." In other words, we were saying to the VCs: "is fifty percent of the global population a large enough market for you guys?"

And yes, one day we might market to men, but not until we move the needle on abysmal gender diversity numbers in tech.

The Pregnancy Gym and The Wing are two sister organizations helping lift our mission at PowerToFly and I couldn't be more excited to see that they probably overcame the same questions we did during their financing rounds.

Career Advice

Growing Your Career in Technical Support: 4 Tips for Getting Hired at Elastic from Support Director Heidi Sager

Heidi Sager loves math, but she also loves working with people.

She always has, which is why she enjoyed her part-time job working at the IT department of the University of Colorado while she was studying electrical engineering. (She'd started in computer science, but explains that it "wasn't for her" and switched her major.) She helped students and professors with word processors, basic programming, and software checkout, and took a full-time job after graduation as a UNIX system administrator.

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Career Advice

3 Women, 7 Lessons: What These Relativity Leaders Learned in 2020

Working at Relativity—the global tech company that equips legal and compliance professionals with a powerful data-organizing and discovery platform—looked different in 2020. The highly collaborative environment of their Chicago headquarters transitioned to a virtual setting, and just like companies around the country, Relativity adapted their goals and major projects to a completely remote environment.

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For Employers

8 (Virtual) Diversity Conferences to Attend in 2021

As you set your personal and professional priorities for 2021, is a diversity and inclusion conference on your agenda? If not, it should be—particularly after 2020's pandemic and racial reckoning have brought D&I issues to the forefront for many.
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Career Advice

Finding Her Sport: Being Part of the Team in a Startup Environment

A Conversation with Vouch's Lead Designer Carrie Phillips

Carrie Phillips was working at a healthcare startup when she connected with one of Vouch Insurance's founders, a friend of a friend from university. The idea he and his cofounder were working on: a way to solve the business insurance problem, piqued her interest. "I was pretty familiar with how broken insurance was," says Carrie, who was interested in the mission, as well as the chance to be their first full-time hire and help build the product from the ground up.
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