GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
By signing up you accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy
BROWSE CATEGORIES
GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
Work-Life Integration

Is The 4-Day Work Week Coming? Microsoft Says It Boosted Productivity

Are You Pro 4-Day Work Week? Tell Us In The Comments!

Microsoft Japan piloted a 4-day work week this summer and the results speak for themselves. According to a recent NPR article recapping the test:

  • There was a productivity boost of 40%
  • Electricity costs fell by 23%
  • Printing decreased by 60%

So how did it work?


  • This August, workers at Microsoft Japan worked four days a week, but earned their normal five-day paychecks as part of "Work Life Choice Challenge 2019 Summer"
  • Standard meetings ran 30 minutes (rather than an hour) & attendance was capped at 5 employees
  • Employees were encouraged to use chat software rather than emails/meetings

Next Steps

Microsoft Japan plans to run a similar test in the winter, but the company has not yet stated whether they will expand the test to other locations or make any official policy changes.

Microsoft isn't the only company toying with measures to boost productivity and work-life balance. In 2018, a New Zealand trust management company announced a 20% gain in employee productivity after testing a four-day work week (they've since made the policy permanent).

And a small tech consulting firm in Germany is toying with a different approach — a 5-hour workday. Workers were expected to arrive at 8, but could leave by 1. To accommodate the reduced hours, the company cut small talk with coworkers, social media, cell phone use, meetings longer than 15 minutes, and excessive email checking.

Still, recent research indicates that younger workers (mainly millennials and Gen Z) care more about flexibility than rigid walls between work and life.

As this recent New York Times article explains, "It's about employees shaping their jobs in ways that fit with their daily lives."

But more flexibility (and technology) could make it almost impossible to unplug...

So what do you think?

A 2018 Kronos Study found that when workers were asked, "If your pay is constant, how many days a week do you want to work?" the top response was four days. (This is all the more impressive given that "none" was on the list of choices.)

  • Is there something magical about a 4-day work week? How many days would you like to work/week if your pay remained constant?
  • How many days/week would you need to finish all your work?
  • If you had to choose between more flexibility or a shorter work-day and/or week, which would you choose and why?
Let us know in the comments!
popular

Looking for a Remote Job During COVID? 3 Talks to Watch

Women Founders & CEOs Share Their Tips

If you're anxious about looking for a new job right now, you're not alone. We've talked before about how you can land a job in the midst of COVID-19, but today we wanted to share advice from some of the experts who spoke at our inaugural Diversity Reboot Summit.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
For Employers

How Your Company Can Fight Racism— Inside & Outside the Workplace

Since the brutal murder of George Floyd, the demand to take a strong stance against racism has swept the nation.
READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
For Employers

How Leaders Can Support Their Black Employees

A five-step framework for addressing systematic racism at work

The world has changed in the past few weeks.

We're watching corporations and organizations across the world come out in support of Black lives in droves. Many of those organizations are doing so for the first time in their history.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Career Advice

“Should I Join a Startup?”

Clyde's Kelly Hall Shares Tips for Moving from a Big Organization to a Startup and a Framework for Making the Decision

Kelly Hall broke a major rule of negotiation when she was interviewing for her current job at product protection startup Clyde.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Diversity & Inclusion

Finding Community at Work: How Viasat's Suzanne Marchi Leans In and Lifts Up Women and Families

About a decade ago, Suzanne Marchi sent an email out to all of the managers on her floor. She was a technical operations manager at global communications and satellite internet company, Viasat, and reaching out to managers to garner support for the participation of women on their teams to connect with other women in similar positions to build a community.
READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Loading...
© Rebelmouse 2020