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In Person Events

The Grace Hopper 2018 Conference Guide: Get The Most Out Of The Celebration

From what to pack for the Grace Hopper Conference to how to network, pitch yourself to employers, and of course, get to the best parties.

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Career and Interview Tips

How To Place Your Story In The Media

My best practices


If you're having trouble purchasing directly from this page then you can do it on Eventbrite here. Send me any feedback at hi@powertofly.com!

After years of being asked how I've placed my pieces in major publications like The New York Times, Fortune, Quartz and Elle and across major TV networks, I decided it was time to put together a quick e-learning to share the knowledge.

My goal is to get more women's voices out there and that's why I tell you in this webinar:

  • What to pitch
  • Who to pitch
  • How to tailor your pitch to a publication
  • The importance of timing and persistence
  • Tips on writing
  • How to find an editor
  • How to follow up on a submission
  • The best ways to promote your piece for television and beyond

Happy learning!

Katharine

Career and Interview Tips

Companies With The Best Maternity Leave Packages

Which companies are good, which ones have a long way to go.

We all know maternity leave (and parental leave as a whole) in the US pales in comparison to the rest of the world. I usually scream when someone compares us to Sweden's amazing government funded leave package, and I usually cry when that person tells me in the same sentence, that the US's lack of leave funding is on par with Papua New Guinea. I'm nearly eight months pregnant with my second child - so my reactions are particularly visceral these days.

That said, maternity leave in the US isn't a total horror show. On the state and city level, strides are being made. I'm proud to be in New York where we introduced a parental leave package in January. (I won't be taking this package, but that's for another blog). San Francisco also has a leave law that's supplemental to the state package. And on top of state and city moves, we're also seeing more of the private sector invest in parental leave to retain employees.

I've pasted a partial chart The New York Times ran that breaks down company leave packages. The whole chart is here in an article that was written in response to Walmart and Starbucks extending their leave packages in January. A few PowerToFly partners are listed at the top of the chart, including Amazon (follow Amazon on PowerToFly to get updates on events, openings, more).

Read the chart carefully because there are still discrepancies between salaried and hourly works. Also, despite positive news that shows massive corporations recognize they need to invest in parents, we need to still remember that only twelve percent of the private sector provides paid leave.

Katharine Zaleski's Blog

Productivity Planning When You Know You're Overwhelmed

Last Saturday night I had a nightmare. I went to LA for a business trip and I spent hours trying to find my ticket home only to realize that I had never booked it. I woke up in a cold sweat. Once I collected myself - with the help of copious amounts of coffee - I made a triage list to get me through the week.

I've written in this blog before about my productivity methods and the personality tests I took to understand what I needed. I use a journal called the "Productivity Planner" and I time my work in Pomodoro intervals. My goal is to break everything down into simple tasks. Last week, I stopped doing that and not only did I have a much lower productivity rate, but my subconscious started to get overwhelmed.

So my advice to anyone who is feeling overwhelmed is simple: break everything down into tasks and set a Pomodoro timer. Then wait to see if you have dreams about whether you bought your tickets home - you won't have them, at least not as often.


In Person Events

Free Women In Tech Events: My Top Dos

What's coming in 2018 and how to do it right.

Last May PowerToFly started throwing in-person events for women in tech and across digital. We were already doing virtual events and webinars, but it only seemed natural to ramp up live meetups for our community that reaches over 12 million women.

We've now held over thirty events, and needless to say, learned a ton about what works for a women in tech event and what doesn't. I'll summarize a few key points here so that employers can know how to throw events, and women in tech can know what they should expect from an event.

If you're looking for a list of free women in tech events then bookmark PowerToFly's Women in Tech Events list that's constantly updated (most of these events are password protected, so please email talentgrowth@powertofly.com if you want to be included). We do have events in there that aren't tech focused - sales meetups, webinars for employers and a lot more.

Another great resource for women in tech events is MeetUp. You can search for events in your area or globally. Not all the events are free like PowerToFly's are. So dig through and see what you can get. The same goes for Eventbrite's list of women in tech events. Some are free, many are not. So if you're looking for free women in tech events then I can't stress how much you'll want to save our PowerToFly list.

Dos for Throwing a Women in Tech Event

Do - Be transparent about how your company is creating a more inclusive environment.

Companies have a long way to go on this front. Don't pretend you're perfect. No one is - yet. I love this example of an interview I conducted around an event for Dow Jones with one of their Senior Engineers who they hired at nine months pregnant.


Do cut the sales-y talk. Use real examples.

Women want to see what you're building - they want to look at code or hear the stories around a product. They don't want to be pitched on why your company is so great. A good example of this is from an event we recently did with Amazon where we got an inside look into the challenges of building Amazon food. The presenter was a woman, with two children, who fielded questions Amazon food's code-base along with whether she takes her kid to his doctor's appointments every time. You'll have to come to an event to learn about Amazon's code base because that conversation was off the record, but when it comes to taking kids to the doctor in the middle of a workday, yes, the developer told the room that she does it frequently. (Obviously she picks up her unfinished work later in the day, post appointment).

PowerToFly is running a series of women in tech events with Amazon in the Seattle area this winter. If any Seattle women in tech want to join us then follow Amazon for updates here.

Do Feature women and their stories

Not every company needs to feature a panel that has stories like Mona's (scroll up to the video if you want a refresher on who I'm referring to). Panels with women - and men - on them that can articulate what it means to thrive at a company without having to sacrifice one's personal life are key. We did an Austin women in tech event for Homeaway with a line up that included men, women and even the CEO of Expedia. The panel was all women, but as you can see from our write up about this Austin women in tech event there was a strong mix of stories. Another one of my favorite panels was with Dow Jones. We had a mix of women on there who could speak to feeling they belonged despite disabilities, sexual orientation, parenting duties and more. I've pasted a photo in of that women in tech event from this past summer.




Do Include hiring managers (no matter their gender)

Don't throw a women in tech event that only has women. Men make most of the hiring decisions - we need them included at these events. Our Phoenix women in tech event with American Express was a perfect example of how important it is to have hiring managers mix with women in tech. If you don't get hiring managers at these events, then they're not meeting women in tech, and women in tech are not meeting them. The event will feel like another - check the box - recruiting gig.

American Express Tech VP's mingling with Phoenix women in tech

Do Follow up

If you're looking to make hires then don't wait to contact women in tech you've brought to your event. Women in tech are in demand. Just look at all the companies trying to hire more women in tech in 2018. And if you want more stats on how diversity is a priority for top companies, then check out LinkedIn's 2018 hiring trends report.

Need more inspiration of what a good women in tech event looks like? I've pasted in some photos from our PowerToFly Instagram account. Keep scrolling.


Are you looking for women in Tech Events in 2018?

Here's PowerToFly's entire line up through March 2018.

I'll be building out a list for specific women in tech events for -

Women in Tech Events Bay Area

Women in Tech Events NYC

Women in Tech Events Seattle

Women in Tech Austin Events



Instagram post by Colette Ellis • Jun 13, 2017 at 11:41pm UTC

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