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Morgan Stanley Technology

Watch Our Virtual Conversation with Tech Leaders at Morgan Stanley

PowerToFly was thrilled to close out August 2020 with a special virtual event featuring women tech leaders and allies from Morgan Stanley, specifically from their Montreal office.

As a global financial services leader, Morgan Stanley boasts a remarkable tech team that leverages innovative and emerging technology to refine that production line.

WATCH THE VIRTUAL EVENT HERE

Speakers from Morgan Stanley included:

  • Sophia Bennaceur, COO for Montreal
  • Kateryna Zaslavska, Development Lead in Settlements Technology
  • David Cardon, Reliability & Production Engineering Montreal Lead
  • Lynne Tudor-Long, Access Management Regional Lead
  • Silvana Rizzo, Product Manager, Infrastructure Services Financial Planning & Analytics Applications
Morgan Stanley is hiring in Montreal and would love to connect with skilled professionals.

To learn more about the company, check out this short introductory video.

Morgan Stanley Technology

Unique Evening with Morgan Stanley's Cutting-Edge Technologists / Soirée Unique avec les Remarquables Technologistes de Morgan Stanley

If you are a skilled tech professional and you are interested in attending this event, please email events@powertofly.com to be considered for an invite. Si vous êtes un professionnel qualifié des technologies et que vous souhaitez assister à cet événement, veuillez envoyer un courrier électronique à events@powertofly.com pour être pris en compte pour une invitation.

Join Morgan Stanley and PowerToFly for a night of networking, tech talks, and panel discussions on Thursday, October 10th, featuring Morgan Stanley's cutting-edge technologists. The evening's speakers will share insights into their latest projects, their career journeys, and take questions from the audience.

Find out why it's an exciting time for technologists to work in financial services.

This event is a great fit for women working as Backend or Fullstack Developers (Java, C++, C#, Python), Data Scientists, DevOps Specialists, Cyber Security Specialists, Database Administrators, QA Automation Specialists, Linux/Unix, and Cloud Computing Specialists.

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Morgan Stanley Technology

An Invite-Only Evening with Morgan Stanley's Cutting Edge Technologists

If you are a skilled tech professional working as a Backend or Fullstack Engineer, Data Scientist, Agile Coach, or Scrum Master and you'd like to attend this event, please email events@powertofly.com to be considered for an invitation.

Join PowerToFly and Morgan Stanley for an evening of networking and tech talks on Thursday, June 13th featuring Morgan Stanley's cutting-edge technologists. They will discuss their latest projects, their career journeys, and take questions from the audience.

Find out why it's an exciting time for technologists to work in financial services.

This event is a great fit for women working as Backend or Fullstack Engineers, Data Scientists, Agile Coaches, or Scrum Masters.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Morgan Stanley Technology

Anjali, Vice President, Technology

Anjali Menon, VP Technology with Morgan Stanley, sits down with Rebecca Knight at Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 2017 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida.

Introduction

Growing up in India, Anjali didn't need to look very far for female role models in technology. She and her two sisters all had a knack for math and science and ultimately pursued careers related to science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, fields.

A native of Bengaluru, a hub of technology and home to many startups, Anjali remembers learning in first grade to code in Basic, an elementary programming language, and using it to maneuver a digital turtle around a screen. In primary school, she learned other programming languages, such as Pascal and C, and then—as she put it—was on her way.

Anjali earned a BE in Computer Science and Engineering from C.M.R. Institute of Technology in Bengaluru, India, and an MS in Computer Science from the Courant Institute of Mathematics, New York University.

How did your love of technology lead you to Morgan Stanley?

I always had a real aptitude for mathematics and sciences—it's definitely a family trait. I was placed in a mathematics and sciences track in high school. In India, children—girls and boys alike—are often encouraged to enter STEM-related fields, such as engineering, medicine, and computer science, as there's always a need for those types of positions.

I came to New York City for graduate school, and it was there that I heard about Morgan Stanley and its three-month Technology Analyst Program. The program, known as TAP, involved intense, classroom-based training in application development, as well as in our various proprietary technologies. I liked the on-the-job training aspect of it, as well as the rotational structure, so I applied and was accepted to the program in 2011.

I was first placed with Field and Client Technologies in the Wealth Management division and worked primarily as a client-side developer on various reporting dashboards for Branch Managers and Financial Advisors. I later moved on to the capacity-metrics team, where we analyzed server metrics and reported on the health of the sector's infrastructure.

Now, after seven years, I'm an IT systems owner in Capital Markets, and I oversee development of the equities and options order-entry applications, as well as the syndicates validation engine. They're systems that our Financial Advisors use to validate and process stock-order placements, and they are essential to Morgan Stanley's trading operations.

Over the course of your career, have you noticed a sea change for female technologists? Do you see more women entering the field and rising to leadership positions?

Over the past few years at Morgan Stanley, I've seen the gender gap in technology narrow. We're very fortunate to see more and more women applying, and being hired, to TAP.

Representation is so important to young women in school and university. It's our responsibility as women technologists to be the change we wish to see in the world, so we need to actively reach out to these women and present ourselves as role models to develop a consistent pipeline through events like the firm's Women in Technology panels, internship opportunities, and our Girls Who Code summer immersion program, to name a few.

You're an active participant in the firm's annual delegation to the Grace Hopper Celebration, an international gathering of female technologists. What do you enjoy most about the event?

Without question, I enjoy being around so many other talented female technologists and seeing what they're working on in terms of research, either as academics or professionals in private companies. When I was in graduate school, men always outnumbered women, generally 60/40. So when you're at a conference surrounded by other women with similar backgrounds, interests, struggles and achievements, it's simultaneously comforting and inspiring.

As an experienced member of the firm's delegation, I'll be doing a lot of formal and informal interviews with students who approach our booth at the conference. With 20,000 people scheduled to attend, we anticipate a lot of foot traffic. When I chat with students, I talk to them about their specific interests in technology. Seeing what candidates are interested in and what they can bring to the firm is always exciting.

What do you say to students who are interested in entering STEM fields?

It's so important to know yourself as a person, in terms of your preferences and the environment where you'll be happiest. Develop a strong background in computer science, and remember that first impressions are often based on how you present on paper, so make sure all of your key accomplishments are reflected on your resume. Also, keep an eye out for important opportunities, from information sessions to internships—anything that can lead to someone or something that can open a door.

Asking questions is also a big part of any job, so don't be afraid to speak up, especially if you're a woman. In addition, advocating for yourself is a big part of advancing and, ultimately, getting to where you want to go. It's always wonderful to have colleagues who will speak up for you, but a fundamental skill is learning to speak up for yourself, highlighting your own accomplishments and showing what you've personally brought to a team effort.

What are some of your favorite things about working in tech? What's been the most fun for you?

Technology evolves constantly—it's a vast engine that powers our business. Morgan Stanley computer scientists, in essence, build and curate that engine. Personally, I love the diversity of frameworks, languages, and platforms available to do so. As a result, there's never just one cookie-cutter method of solving a problem, and it's the process of deciding among the myriad of possible solutions that I find the most challenging and, subsequently, most fulfilling.

This article was originally written by Morgan Stanley. Visit Morgan Stanley's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

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