GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
By signing up you accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy
BROWSE CATEGORIES
GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
Random

PowerToFly Joins NYC Tech Leaders Opposing Trump Immigration Ban

At PowerToFly we're devoted to diversity, inclusion and the crucial role immigrants have in building up America. My parents are both immigrants - my father's parents survived the Holocaust and my mother's parents fought Hitler as members of the British Army (my grandmother was a nurse and my grandfather was a surgeon who parachuted into war zones to set up mash units where he would operate).


Photo Credit: Lorie Shaull

Both my parents came here when they were children and owe so much to immigration policies that fueled our nation forward.

Milena, my cofounder at PowerToFly, is an immigrant from Bulgaria. We often remark how our relationship works because of our disparate backgrounds. But one thing is consistent - we both wouldn't be here without the immigration policies that have built America.

That's why Milena and I are so proud to sign this letter from over 400 tech leaders in NYC, condemning President Trump's Executive Order on immigration.

You can read it from the original source here from Tech NYC.org. The body of the entire letter is pasted below.

January 30, 2017

President Trump:

We are business leaders and investors from New York City’s robust and growing technology

sector. Among the reasons we proudly build and grow companies here in New York City is

the rich diversity the city and its residents provide. We write out of concern that your recent executive orders will undermine that and send a dangerous message to all immigrants that they are not welcome here.

America has long provided homes and futures to millions who dared to share in our

collective dream. There is nowhere this is more true than New York City—home to Ellis

Island, the Statue of Liberty, and more foreign-born immigrants than any other city in the

world. Your executive orders suspending entry for citizens of certain countries, even those who currently have legal status, along with limiting the refugee program, threaten those immigrants who are our current and future neighbors, friends, colleagues, customers, and even bosses. Their presence is a crucial ingredient that sets New York City apart and a fundamental reason why we have all chosen to build our careers and companies here.

In addition to all of the humanitarian reasons to welcome refugees, it is dangerous to

discourage immigration when the facts show that immigrant entrepreneurs play a significant role in the American economy. Immigrants are more than twice as likely to start a business

as the native-born population. Immigrant entrepreneurs started, in whole or in part, some of the most important technology companies of our time including LinkedIn, Tesla Motors,

Zipcar, Google, Intel, Yahoo!, eBay, and WhatsApp. More than half of the companies on the current list of U.S. technology startups valued at $1 billion or more were started by

immigrants.

We should be doing everything in our power to attract these entrepreneurs to the United

States. Yet when we close the door to immigrants from certain countries, not to mention to

refugees, we are telling all immigrants that they are not welcome here.

We are confident that we can achieve security without threatening the inclusivity and

diversity at the heart of New York City—and the United States. We encourage you to rescind

your recent executive orders.

Sincerely,

Katharine Zaleski

Cofounder and President of PowerToFly

Milena Berry

Cofounder and CEO of PowerToFly

[Click here for additional signatures and the full letter]

Career Advice

Growing Your Career in Technical Support: 4 Tips for Getting Hired at Elastic from Support Director Heidi Sager

Heidi Sager loves math, but she also loves working with people.

She always has, which is why she enjoyed her part-time job working at the IT department of the University of Colorado while she was studying electrical engineering. (She'd started in computer science, but explains that it "wasn't for her" and switched her major.) She helped students and professors with word processors, basic programming, and software checkout, and took a full-time job after graduation as a UNIX system administrator.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Career Advice

3 Women, 7 Lessons: What These Relativity Leaders Learned in 2020

Working at Relativity—the global tech company that equips legal and compliance professionals with a powerful data-organizing and discovery platform—looked different in 2020. The highly collaborative environment of their Chicago headquarters transitioned to a virtual setting, and just like companies around the country, Relativity adapted their goals and major projects to a completely remote environment.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
For Employers

8 (Virtual) Diversity Conferences to Attend in 2021

As you set your personal and professional priorities for 2021, is a diversity and inclusion conference on your agenda? If not, it should be—particularly after 2020's pandemic and racial reckoning have brought D&I issues to the forefront for many.
READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Career Advice

Finding Her Sport: Being Part of the Team in a Startup Environment

A Conversation with Vouch's Lead Designer Carrie Phillips

Carrie Phillips was working at a healthcare startup when she connected with one of Vouch Insurance's founders, a friend of a friend from university. The idea he and his cofounder were working on: a way to solve the business insurance problem, piqued her interest. "I was pretty familiar with how broken insurance was," says Carrie, who was interested in the mission, as well as the chance to be their first full-time hire and help build the product from the ground up.
READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Loading...
© Rebelmouse 2020