GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
By signing up you accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy
BROWSE CATEGORIES
GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
Women at Work

Secrets to Working Well With Developers

Working as a developer requires very specific qualifications—a set of norms, priorities, and even languages that are often foreign to non-developers.


As a result, working with a developer can also call for a particular set of skills. But the key to building great relationships and easing tension between developers and non-developers is simple: it all starts with communication.

If you work with developers, whether you're in marketing, editorial, ops, or another department, chances are you've experienced the disconnect between these siloed fields first hand. Maybe not in a full-on interdepartmental feud, but what about a missed deadline caused by lack of communication? A terse email that could've easily been avoided? Experiences like these are not uncommon.

Dmitry Shamis, a Tech Lead at HubSpot, wrote some advice for non-developers in this situation: "How to Work With a Developer: 6 Tips for Improving Your Relationship." As a developer working at a marketing company, he knows very well that "[developers] speak a different language than marketers, making effective communication a bit of a challenge." Below are a few of Dmitry's recommendations for navigating this relationship.

"Include [developers] in the planning process." If a product or feature is going to need a developer down the line, it's best to include them from the beginning. They don't need to have creative input, but their technical expertise will help keep the plan on the right track and avoid delays in the future.

"Don't make assumptions." Only a developer can know how technically complicated something is going to be. Don't assume that any request will be quick or easy. Coordinate with your developers to "evaluate the complexity of a task," says Dmitry, "before [establishing] a hard deadline."

"Understand what you're asking for." Even if you're not a developer, it's a good idea to be educated about the basics of developing — you'll only be improving your communication skills. Learn the building blocks of the web, like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and look into free online resources like Codecademy to go even further.

In the end, a successful relationship with your developers is all about communication. Effectively communicating across departments isn't easy, but it starts with recognizing your pain points and improving from there. "Talk to your developers about your projects, don't just hand them assignments," Dmitry suggests. "Remember: You're all in this together."

Check out the rest of Dmitry's advice on the HubSpot marketing blog.

Do you have any advice or tips for tech and non-tech teams working cohesively? Share it with us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

New Relic

From Event to Offer: How Sales Exec Danielle Satterfield Found Her Next Challenge at New Relic

When Danielle Satterfield attended a PowerToFly networking event with cloud-based observability platform New Relic last December, she wasn't actively looking for a job.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels through the FB AIR Program
Jobs

Applications Are Open for Facebook's Return to Work Program!

We're excited to announce applications are now open for Facebook's Return to Work program. We have positions open for 10 roles:

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Work From Home

The Two Causes of Conflict Within a Team: And How to Resolve Them

(With specific tips for remote teams!)

Teams have conflict. It happens. Whether it's disagreeing with your manager's feedback, going head-to-head with a coworker for a promotion, or feeling supreme levels of annoyance at the department head who consistently claims credit for work he didn't do, all of us have gotten into it at some point on the job. (One of my favorite personal conflicts was when a woman who worked for me refused to use our publication's style guide when communicating on behalf of the business. Yes, I once found myself screaming in a newsroom about the need to use size-16 Tahoma in marketing materials rather than size-12 Times New Roman. But I promise I'm better at dealing with conflict now.)
READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Diversity Reboot Summit Speakers

Join Us to Discuss the Future of Work: Come to Our (Virtual!) Diversity Reboot Summit

Join Diversity reboot 2020 virtually

COVID-19 has forced us to map the future of our workplaces at a dizzying new pace.

The Diversity Reboot 2020 Summit is a virtual gathering for professionals who want to share how we can all rebuild faster in partnership with diverse talent. Join us, along with thousands of diverse women and allies, to remake our world the way it ought to be.

Learn more here

Loading...
© Rebelmouse 2020