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Code Tasting: Data and Algorithms

Ready for today's virtual chat with a #coding expert? TOPIC: Code Tasting: Data and Algorithms. Learning to code has become a phenomenon - and we couldn't be more elated! However, it can be discouraging to see that many virtual programs require at LEAST a weeks’ long commitment, and #bootcamps/ academic classes cost a lot. Research in #ComputerScience education suggests that having even a minimal background before taking the dive into formal instruction is beneficial, as is getting the right start. Ursula Wolz, PhD, has been teaching introductory coding for over 30 years using innovate classroom techniques. She invented a conceptual model called ‘DAHLIA’ that stands for ‘Data’, ‘Algorithms’, ‘Heuristics’, ‘Logic’, ‘Interface’ and ‘Abstraction' which we'll be covering virtually, on PowerToFly! This three-part series introduces these concepts in three lessons as well as suggestions for further work. Using the P5.js online framework, participants will dive into code within five minutes of the first session. A ‘homework’ challenge will be given at the end of the session for those who want to take things further, along with access for time with Ursula if needed! Submit your questions and join the conversation! ⤵️
Uber

8-80 Coding: Supporting tech for all ages in Philadelphia

Uber

Below is an article originally written by Craig Ewer at PowerToFly Partner Uber, and published on October 30, 2017. Go to Uber's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

At Uber, we believe that technology is for everyone — whether you're a student in a Philadelphia Public School or someone looking for a new career later in life. That's why today we're excited to launch 8-80 Coding, a new initiative to support technology education for people of all ages in Philadelphia.

Beginning this month, we're working with three of the region's top nonprofits to expand coding education for kids and adults. From our rec centers to our tech centers, we want Philadelphians to have access to the work opportunities generated by tech education, but also to experience the personal satisfaction and fun of building something new. In the process, we hope to expand the pipeline of people historically underrepresented in technology and make Philadelphia's tech community more reflective of our community as a whole.

"I'm excited that a global company as big as Uber understands the value of providing free coding programs in Philadelphia. Tech education is crucial, not only for our schoolchildren, who will receive some of this training, but for also for adults seeking new skills and jobs. There are many tech jobs for which you don't need a college degree, but you do need the right training. Uber and the great local nonprofits with whom the company is teamed will have tremendous success in promoting diversity in coding and tech education and ultimately job growth. I look forward to helping out any way I can to make this a great project for Philadelphia."

– City Councilman-at-Large Allan Domb

Here's what we have in store for the next 12 months:

The ITEM advocates for better inclusion in the tech industry as a way to reduce systemic inequality, and, with our support, they have established a new scholarship program for continuing adult education. Through the end of 2017, four Uber Scholars will complete a course on Amazon Web Services, a highly valued certification for employers in today's competitive job market. These scholars will also be eligible for mentoring opportunities with members of Uber's engineering team.

"The ITEM's mission vis-a-vis the students of our academy is simple: Trained. Certified. Hired. Uber's support of our students being trained and certified as AWS Solutions Architect Associates is a major boost to our vision of all Philadelphians accessing our emerging technology sector."

– Kahiga Tiagha, Cofounder of The ITEM

Coded by Kids offers free tech education for children ages 5-18, primarily through in-school and extracurricular coding projects. As part of 8-80 Coding, we're supporting Coded by Kid's yearlong coding class at the Academy at Palumbo public high school in South Philadelphia, where students will learn the basics of web development (HTML, CSS, etc.) and complete a project for their web portfolios.

"We are excited to work with Uber to ensure Philadelphia's pipeline of tech talent is diverse and well prepared to compete in the innovation economy. Uber knows that jobs are becoming increasingly more technical and skilled, and by investing in a Pathways into Tech program they are making a commitment to provide more students with the opportunity to get those technical skills."

– Maggie Deptola, COO, Coded by Kids

Finally, we're supporting TechGirlz, whose mission is "to inspire middle school girls to explore the possibilities of technology to empower their future careers." Through a series of workshops and special events, TechGirlz is helping create the next generation of female coders and working to close the gender gap in technology.

"We are excited to be part of the 8-80 Coding program and by Uber's support of our mission to inspire girls on the path to empowered careers in technology. Uber's innovative roots and renewed commitment to positive change make it a great partner in championing our new model for women in technology."

– Tracey Welson-Rossman, Founder and CEO of TechGirlz

These three initiatives are only the beginning. With our partners, we're ready to make a difference in Philadelphia and continue building a future that is more diverse and more inclusive.

33Across

Meet Gulnara M., Software Engineer at 33 Across

Gulnara M. chats about being self-taught in code, diversity in tech, and artificial intelligence

Below is an article originally written by PowerToFly hiring partner 33 Across, and published on May 11, 2018. Go to 33 Across' page on PowerToFly to learn more.

Some of us can say that we taught ourselves how to ride a bike, or maybe even how to play an instrument. Our Software Engineer Gulnara Mirzakarimova took it up a few notches by teaching herself how to code! After a career in finance she decided that she wanted to do something different. Learn more about why Gulnara wanted to get into engineering, how we can improve diversity within the industry, and how engineers can prepare for the future of artificial intelligence!

How did you make the decision to become an engineer?
I was working in finance for four years and I realized that it was not something that I was interested in. I wanted to be able to create things and have the flexibility to work from anywhere. I used to run a community group of entrepreneurs in Washington, D.C. and I liked what I saw. A lot of the members were developers and they were building some pretty interesting things. I then decided to learn how to code, while still working in finance and I loved it. So, I quit my job and began working as a developer. This was five years ago and I have been working as a developer ever since.

What is the best work environment/setting for you to be at your most productive state?
I work from home 90% of the time. Sometimes I'll work out of a coffee shop. I like to be able to tune out sound and distractions when I work so I use noise canceling headphones. Depending on what I'm building, I like to be able to listen to either classical or techno music. I've noticed that if I am in an early stages of conceptualizing the problem I tend to listen to slow classical music. But when I have the solution figured out and am implementing it, I switch to high-paced techno music. In both scenarios, I like to work uninterrupted. The main reason can be explained by this comic.

What role do you think that artificial intelligence (AI) will play in the future? How should engineers prepare for it?
Tech is developing faster than we can keep up. New tools, languages, and frameworks are being created all the time. There are a lot of tools available for engineers to prepare for AI, they include data science, machine learning, and deep learning.

As a female engineer, what do you think could be done to encourage more women to explore the profession?
I think we should not only focus on women but on all minorities and it has to start early – I am talking primary school. How can you be interested in something you don't know anything about? I recently gave a talk at a middle school where I told kids about what developers do and told them that there are lots of ways one can become a developer. Kids have some idea of what teachers, doctors, lawyers and bankers do. But the tech industry is still a pandora's box to many of them.

What's your favorite way to spend the weekend?
I don't have one favorite way of spending a weekend. But you can usually find me doing the following in any given month on a weekend: sketching and painting with watercolors, hiking, or going to a botanical garden. I like visiting Harry Potter World and Jurassic World at Universal Studios. I also enjoy barbecuing, baking and of course binge watching TV shows. I'm currently watching The Expanse, Killing Eve, and WestWorld.

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