×
Create a Free Profile on PowerToFly
Exclusive event invitations with hiring managers, live chats with female thought leaders and the latest remote, flexible and in office roles and companies committed to creating more diverse and inclusive workplaces.
GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
Symantec

Symantec: Diverse Teams are Stronger Teams

Below is an article originally written by Daniel Lopez, Competitive Intelligence Analyst at PowerToFly Partner Symantec, and published on January 14, 2019. Go to Symantec's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Daniel L. shares his experiences of being a new immigrant in the United States and how his longing for cultural familiarity morphed into a curiosity for the unknown.

We fear what we do not understand. To compensate, we seek familiarity, which helps us feel accepted and secure. I am no exception to this rule.

I immigrated from Colombia to the United States in my early teens. I didn't speak the language nor did I understand the cultural differences. For example, I wasn't used to moving from classroom to classroom at school with so many different teachers, so my first week was a disaster to say the least. I was also used to playing pick up soccer every afternoon but I couldn't find anyone around to play with. I regularly felt overwhelmed and isolated.

These are just a few of the many transitional challenges I faced as a new immigrant. And, as a result, the people I chose to surround myself with in high school and college were people just like me. They felt familiar, gave me safety, and – without a doubt – comfort. Assimilating to the US was much easier in a community of people living through the same immigrant experience as I was.

The longing I had felt as a new immigrant for cultural familiarity, safety, and comfort had morphed into a curiosity for the unknown.

By the time I graduated from the University of South Florida in 2007, things changed. I was living in a self-insulated bubble, and in order to pursue my own personal development, that bubble needed to be burst. The longing I had felt as a new immigrant for cultural familiarity, safety, and comfort had morphed into a curiosity for the unknown.

This curiosity led me to Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan, outside of Detroit, the heart of one of the largest populations of Arab Americans in the United States. For the second time in my life, I was a minority. Again, I immersed myself in a totally new language, culture, and a completely different religion. It was strange and awesome all at the same time. Strange because there were no Colombian restaurants around; and awesome because I joined a very competitive soccer league made up of mostly Middle Eastern players. These are just a few examples.

My time in Dearborn fed my hunger for curiosity that I first felt after graduation. I was continually encouraged to intentionally explore new places, meet new people, experience different cultures, understand other religions, and search for new ideas. To say I loved it would be an understatement. I still joke with my wife about needing a weekly hummus injection to satisfy my cravings for Mediterranean food – which is harder to fulfill now that I live in Tampa, FL.

I was continually encouraged to intentionally explore new places, meet new people, experience different cultures, understand other religions, and search for new ideas.

Fast-forward five years and now I find myself as part of Symantec's Competitive Intelligence (CI) team under the Enterprise Security Group (ESG). Of all the teams I've worked with, I've come to appreciate this team the most. The CI team embodies the diversity I've sought since I lived in Dearborn. The ten team members run the gamut across ethnic backgrounds, personalities, and even hobbies outside of work. For example:

  • We represent a total of nine nationalities: Australia, Canada, Colombia, England, Germany, Israel, Japan, Spain, and the USA
  • We have all kinds of personalities, such as: reserved intellectuals, outspoken analytical minds, and those who "tell it like it is"
  • We participate in a variety of hobbies, like mountain climbing, classical music, mountain biking, hunting, running, soccer, and car racing

So why does all this matter? It matters because our individual differences strengthen us as a team. Our variety gives us dynamism and balance, while also inspiring us to look for things we have in common. Our heterogeneity facilitates incredible, meticulous strategic thinking, and forces us to push our boundaries – both personally and professionally. Our diverse backgrounds are the foundation for our diverse thinking. Put all of this together and we have got an invaluable team of individuals making a superior, positive impact on our organization and within the greater world of IT security. I'm honored to be a part of it.

Our diverse backgrounds are the foundation for our diverse thinking.

The Symantec Competitive Intelligence (CI) team has taught me that strength in unity is rooted in differences, and that, without a doubt, diversity makes us more creative, innovative, and empathetic toward ourselves and others – including our customers.

With that in mind, my challenge for you is to be more curious. Instead of sticking only to what you know and what's in your comfort zone, how can you be courageous and be intentionally interested in other people, ideas, perspectives, and communities? I challenge you to put yourself in situations that feel foreign so that you may learn and grow from others. Together, let's challenge the status quo and disrupt the dominant, homogeneous, stereotypically-male IT narrative. Like me, I suspect you'll find it liberating and refreshing.

Ultimately, I've found that even when we look, sound, or act differently on a surface level, underneath all of that we're much more alike than most of us dare to imagine. When you do dare to imagine and put forth a little effort, you will see it as well.

Let's stop being afraid of our differences, and instead recognize the strength and power within them.

Optoro

Meet Caitlin Henry - Optoro's Software Development Lead

Below is an article originally written by Sarah Foulke at PowerToFly Partner Optoro, and published on February 28, 2019. Go to Optoro's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Optoro is made up of a diverse collection of individuals who have come together to achieve a single mission–to transform the reverse logistics industry by finding homes for used and excess goods. We like to highlight that diversity with our Employee Spotlight blog series, during which we sit down with an employee every month to hear a little bit about the people who make the Optoro culture so distinctive.

How would you describe yourself in 10 keywords or fewer?
Go big or go home.

What is your role at Optoro, and what do you do?
I'm the software development lead for the Return to Vendor team. We make a product that helps our client manage a workflow to return items to their original manufacturers for credit, based on agreements that retailers have with their vendors. I work with the other developers on my team, as well as design, product management, and quality engineering to develop and deliver new features to the Return to Vendor product.

What did you do before Optoro, and why did you choose to work at Optoro?
Before Optoro, I worked as a software developer at another DC startup. I chose to come to Optoro to get a new experience with a different technology and a larger team. I was attracted to the mission, product, and vision at Optoro, and knew that this was a place where I could grow my career. The company is in a really exciting place right now, and I thought it was a great time to join the team.

What is the most important thing you have learned since starting at Optoro?
If you're afraid to do something, you should do it more often.

What is the best part of working at Optoro?
I think Optoro is especially unique in the way that everyone truly cares about each other. People say that a lot, but it does really feel different to me here. Everyone I work with is constantly seeking out ways to collaborate to get to a team goal. People are open and honest about what they feel is working and what isn't, and everyone is always trying to make Optoro a better place for all employees to work.

What would you most likely be doing on a normal Saturday afternoon in your free time?
Most weekends you'll find me exploring DC and all it has to offer! I sold my car about a year and a half ago and I'm loving my car-free life. My fiance and I are usually going for a run in Rock Creek Park, working on projects in our new condo, trying out new restaurants with friends, or kicking back with our cat and watching some terrible reality television.

Invesco

Diversity of Thought at Invesco

At Invesco, they're never dominated by a single opinion. They challenge and inspire each other to explore possibilities and uncover valuable insights.

If you're interested in joining their team, click here to see all available opportunities at Invesco and don't forget to press 'Follow' to receive custom job matches, event invitations and more!

Thales Usa Inc.

Meet Parimah, Technical Support Engineer At Thales

Here's how Parimah explains others' reactions to her job at Thales: "People are always interested when they hear my job is to stop hackers". All this in a company culture that Parimah describes as fun, challenging, and innovative!

If you're interested in joining the team at Thales, click here to see all of their available opportunities and don't forget to press 'Follow' to receive custom job matches, event invitations and more!

Loading...