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General Assembly

How General Assembly Is Breaking Barriers To Tech

General Assembly's Opportunity Fund scholarship program allows students like Kazumi to pursue the work they love. To learn more about how General Assembly is helping build a more diverse tech workforce, visit their Social Impact page.

Are you interested in joining their impactful team?

If yes, then click here to see all available opportunities at General Assembly, and don't forget to press 'Follow' to receive custom job matches, event invitations and more!

S&P Global Inc

S&P Global Diversity & Inclusion

S&P Global's Campus Recruiting team recently partnered with their Diversity & Inclusion team to profile recent graduate hires who are active with at least one of S&P Global's 9 employee resource groups. These graduates represent a variety of employee resource groups globally and they come from different backgrounds, programs, and divisions, showcasing the true diversity of S&P Global employees.

Would you be interested in working as part of such a diverse and inclusive team?

If yes, then click here to see all available opportunities at S&P Global, and don't forget to press 'Follow' to receive custom job matches, event invitations and more!

Thales Usa Inc.

Diversity and Inclusion at Thales

Plus, they're currently hiring!

At Thales, they work in open-minded teams that value the diversity each employee brings, whatever their background. In the video above, Thales employees share why they champion for diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Interested in being part of such an impressive team?

Click here to see all available opportunities at Thales, and don't forget to press 'Follow' to receive custom job matches, event invitations and more!

General Assembly

Data Science Education Lags Behind in Diversity

Below is an article originally written by PowerToFly Partner General Assembly, and published on September 25, 2017. Go to General Assembly's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

As gender and racial representation improve in other tech disciplines, the study of data science hasn't caught up.

In the past few years, much attention has been drawn to the dearth of women and people of color in tech-related fields. A recent article in Forbes noted, "Women hold only about 26% of data jobs in the United States. There are a few reasons for the gender gap: a lack of STEM education for women early on in life, lack of mentorship for women in data science, and human resources rules and regulations not catching up to gender balance policies, to name a few." Federal civil rights data further demonstrate that "black and Latino high school students are being shortchanged in their access to high-level math and science courses that could prepare them for college" and for careers in fields like data science.

As an education company offering tech-oriented courses at 20 campuses across the world, General Assembly is in a unique position to analyze the current crop of students looking to change the dynamics of the workplace.

Looking at GA data for our part-time programs (which typically reach students who already have jobs and are looking to expand their skill set as they pursue a promotion or a career shift), here's what we found: While great strides have been made in fields like web development and user experience (UX) design, data science — a relatively newer concentration — still has a ways to go in terms of gender and racial equality.

Gender Equality in Data Science

For our analysis, we went through five months' worth (September 2016 through January 2017) of anonymized enrollment data for part-time General Assembly students (those enrolled in 10- to 12-week evening courses). It is important to note that our full-time Immersive course data yielded similar results, but we chose to focus on part-time data because the sample size was bigger.

First, let's take a look specifically at the gender breakdown of students in these courses.

On average, our part-time courses skew more female (56.5%) than male (42.3%).

Some courses, like Product Management and Data Analytics, seem to come close to gender parity. Front-End Web Development falls in right around the average across all courses, and in Digital Marketing and User Experience Design, both more consumer-facing fields, two-thirds or more students are women.

But the Data Science course shows the largest composition of male students — and the lowest of female students, at just 35.3%.

Race and Ethnicity in Data Science

Turning to the same anonymized data set, let's now look at race and ethnicity. Is GA's Data Science course equally lacking in minority participation?

At first glance, it appears that Data Science courses fare pretty well in diversity: The percentage of enrolled students who are white (46.1%) is less than average (46.9%).

But looking specifically at Hispanic/Latino and African-American students, the course has — by far — the lowest total percentage of students.

To put this data in context, the population of the United States is 62% white, 17% Hispanic or Latino, 12% African-American, and 6% Asian/Pacific Islander.

Just 11.8% of part-time Data Science enrollees are Hispanic/Latino or African-American. That's 5.7% below the overall average, and nearly half of the figure in the Front-End Web Development courses.

Education in Data Science

This data set also gives us insight into the highest level of education attained from part-time enrollees across GA courses.

On average, Data Science students come in with the highest degree attainment.

Across all courses, 85.4% of part-time GA students have a bachelor's degree or higher; in Data Science, that figure is 93.8%. This seems to largely be driven by the fact that there are far more master's and Ph.D. graduates in Data Science (37.7%) than the overall average (24.%). A surprisingly high 3.7% of students hold a Ph.D. — more than triple the average of 1.2%.

Data Science seems to draw from a smaller, more specialized pool, which could, in part, perpetuate diversity issues.

Data Science Is Still New

Female and minority students have made positive strides in coding and tech education at GA.

When coding and web development started getting popular two decades ago, the fields were almost entirely dominated by men — most of whom were white. Looking at our data here, though, it's clear things have changed for the better: Front-End Web Development courses are now 57% female and boast the highest percentage of students of color of any course.

At General Assembly, we're proud of the growing diversity of our global community, and we actively seek to create an environment where women, people of color, LGBTQ+ individuals, and other underrepresented communities feel empowered to pursue tech and digital training that they may have previously felt was unwelcoming or inaccessible.

Since data science is still a relatively new field, it is possible things may just take some time to equalize. But we should not be complacent. To help accelerate the process, GA has implemented a number of social impact programs (focusing mainly on our full-time Immersive courses), and engages local and federal governments and well as corporate leaders to move the needle on access and diversity. These programs, which have served hundreds of students over the past two years, have created economic mobility for underserved and overlooked talent.

Some specific examples of that work include a partnership with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's Tech Talent Pipeline program, through which GA helped dozens of low-income New Yorkers gain data analytics skills through our part-time programs. We recently launched a similar program through a U.S. Department of Labor grant. The private sector is also starting to step up — BNY Mellon recently invested in General Assembly's Opportunity Fund to train women and people of color to become data scientists.

General Assembly also works with large organizations to increase diversity within their teams. For less than the cost of traditional recruiting agencies, we find high-potential candidates from underrepresented groups, train them in web development, data analytics, or data science, and strategically place them for maximum impact. To ensure that new talent thrives, we offer robust onboarding training that gives both talent and managers the skills and strategies they need for long-term success.

We know these are important early steps, and that we have much work to do to cultivate a more diverse and inclusive data sector.

Zapier Inc

Working on Diversity and Inclusivity at Zapier

Partner Content

Below is an article originally written by Wade Foster at PowerToFly Partner Zapier, and published on October 5, 2017. Go to Zapier's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Diversity in tech is pretty uncommon. It takes effort and there's always more work that can be done towards that goal, since we're all human with our own hidden biases. We think it's worth pursuing, though. Diverse teams are more creative and build better products. They make better decisions and have more successful companies. They're better able to represent the global community at large.

At Zapier, we also think that hiring and fostering a diverse team is just the right thing to do. So over Zapier's last few biannual retreats and in our internal #diversity Slack channel, we've had candid conversations as a company about our hiring process—everything from language choices in our job postings to how we recruit potential teammates and administer skills tests.

As we continue to grow rapidly—we now have over 110 team members, compared to under 50 last year at this time—hiring inclusively is more important than ever. We want to demonstrate our dedication to building a warm, open, and inclusive work environment—one that's safe for people of all backgrounds, including historically underrepresented groups such as people of color, LGBTQ people, people over 40, those with disabilities, and women. We want to make sure we don't unintentionally discourage anyone from applying to Zapier, and we want to give everyone the opportunity to enjoy meaningful remote work here.

Several team members suggested publishing a public changelog of each step we've taken to improve our hiring process. This is that document.

The Changelog in Chronological Order

  • April 2015: Launched a new 14-week, paid parental leave policy to accommodate growing families.
  • August 2015: Set a requirement that every new position we hire for must be posted to the site with a job description.
  • August 2015: Outlined a standard hiring process across each role.
  • August 2015: Edited our job description template to ensure job descriptions use inclusive language and accurately describe the role.
  • September 2015: Created and publicized the Zapier Code of Conduct, then added it to our About page and each job opening.
  • January 2016: Redesigned the about page to show off our personalities and the people behind Zapier.
  • April 2016: Built a Google Chrome extension that hides the names and photos of applicants when we're reviewing applications in our hiring software to help reduce unconscious bias.
  • May 2016: Increased employer-sponsored health coverage to 90% for employees and 50% for spouses and dependents to make Zapier better for employees with families.
  • June 2016: Started a list of job boards with broader audiences to use when promoting new positions.
  • June 2016: Introduced the Zapier Management Framework and gave training to all managers based on the Manager Tools framework. Good managers know how to create safe spaces that allow people to grow and thrive.
  • August 2016: Changed our hiring application question from "Tell us about yourself" to "Tell us about your qualifications for this role".
  • August 2016: Added an optional, anonymous demographic survey for all job applicants to help us track and better understand the characteristics of our applicants over time.
  • August 2016: Published a public changelog (yup, this one!) summarizing our efforts to improve our hiring process.
  • August 2016: Started peer-reviewing each other's internal notes on applicants to make sure that interviewers use fair evaluation techniques for every candidate.
  • November 2016: Built a Google Chrome Extension for Workable that obscures and randomizes applicant photos and names, in an effort to combat unintentional bias in our hiring process.
  • May 2017: Rolled out our first Employee Satisfaction Survey so that we can gauge employee happiness and give people a safe space to voice their opinions.
  • June 2017: Started shuffling the about page daily to better showcase our team.
  • July 2017: Started using a tool called Fairgo that lets us evaluate applications based on answers to each individual question on our application form, while keeping the candidates anonymous.
  • July 2017: Started offering an Upfront Skills Test to allow engineering candidates to demonstrate skills if they don't have code they can share.
  • July 2017: Sent out our first teammate demographic survey so that we can take a look at where we're at and where we can continue to improve.
  • March 2018: Hired a Recruiter dedicated to Diversity Initiatives and Community Outreach.
  • April 2018: Sent out a new teammate demographic survey via Culture Amp to insure anonymity for Zapiens and to encourage candid feedback.

Some of these efforts have helped us reach a more diverse set of applicants. We're committed to improving this process. After each new hire, we review the hiring process with the hiring team and try to learn from each experience. We've also committed to reviewing our hiring process every six months at our team retreats to ensure we keep improving.

We also want to hear from you. If you have an idea based on your own experiences hiring, working on, and building diverse teams, please leave a suggestion for us.

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