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GitLab

GitLab Recruiters - Building a Superstar Brand

Tips and Tricks For Applying To GitLab

In this webcast, GitLab Recruiters Chloe Whitestone and Jacie Zoerb shares what makes a profile stand out and how maintaining a stellar online presence plays an integral role in professional growth. They will also give an inside overview of the GitLab interview and hiring process!

Once you've gotten your profile ready, head on over to GitLab's page on PowerToFly and click 'I'm Interested' to apply! You can also 'Follow' them to receive future job matches, event invites, and more!

Stash

Why Negotiating Your Job Title Matters to Your Career

Partner Content

Below is an article originally written by Rachel Kramer Bussell for PowerToFly Partner Stash, and published on March 1, 2018. Go to Stash's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

What's in a name? A lot, when it comes to your job title.

If you're interested in moving up the corporate ladder, having a title that accurately reflects your status and experience is vital when it comes to your next promotion request or job search.

Why your job title matters

Job titles are one of the key ways hiring managers make their decisions, says Elizabeth Mattila, director of human resources for a biopharmaceutical industry consultant company.

A mismatched job title may undersell your skill set, causing you to lose out on a perfect job.

"When you're interviewing for a job, the new company doesn't yet know you and what you offer, so much of what they judge you on is your title," she says. "If your experience is more advanced than your title suggests, right from the get-go you're on a uphill climb convincing a new company of what you'd bring to the role."

Sometimes, companies may not have the budget to give raises for a given period of time, but if you've put in the effort to earn yourself a more prestigious job title, you should still request it.

This higher title will help when you do start sending out your resume, especially since employers often favor those who are already employed.

"Fair or not, there's a direct correlation between title and pay," says Matilla. "Some companies will say they have no titles because they want to get away from what they view as archaic hierarchical levels and put the focus on increasing responsibility as employees grow in their careers. But the reality is, if your title is 'vice president', you're in a stronger salary negotiating position than if it's 'manager'."

When to ask for a new title

But when should you ask—and how?

Toni Littlestone, a Bay Area career counselor with 30 years of experience, advises you to observe the workplace culture and negotiate your title accordingly.

You shouldn't expect to be given a new title in your first year, even if you're doing work that's received praise. If coworkers who started at the same time you did suddenly have new titles, that's worth noting.

Also, pay attention to titles within your company, as well as on job boards, Glassdoor and LinkedIn, so you know what's realistic, says Littlestone.

Some people wait too long, hoping a boss will simply notice their diligence and bestow a new title—and possibly a raise—without being asked. While that may happen on rare occasions, it's unlikely.

Instead, you'll probably have to schedule a time to discuss the title you want with your manager. Your boss may need time to consider your request and negotiate with more senior staffers.

Littlestone advises you to do so "way in advance of when you want the new title."

This is part of a long-term career strategy, not about immediate gratification.

"Getting both a new title and a raise are part of a campaign, in which you're talking with your manager about your goals, how you're doing, soliciting and following up on feedback, and letting your manager know what you're hoping for within the year," Littlestone says.

You can't expect a title change to happen overnight, especially without knowing what's expected of the role.

Don't ask for a job you can't handle

In contrast to those who are overly cautious in their requests, some people may ask for a new title too quickly, such as after only one year on the job. They may be enamored with the idea of moving up in their organization, even if they haven't proven themselves yet.

This is unwise and risky, because even if you're granted your request, you may find yourself in over your head.

Keep trying if you get turned down

If your first approach doesn't succeed, don't give up on ever getting that new title. Your manager may not think you're qualified yet, or there may be internal staffing issues beyond your control.

Littlestone advises you to ask your boss what you can do to advance. Politely inquire whether any aspects of your work need improvement, if there are additional responsibilities you can take on, or skills or education you could acquire.

This shows you're not just looking out for yourself, but also genuinely want to contribute to your workplace at a more advanced level. However, if you keep getting turned down after following their instructions, it may be time to move on to another job.

Make your case

If you believe the work you're doing corresponds with a higher title, don't be afraid to make your case. While those titles often come with commensurate salary raises, it's still worth asking, even if they don't. You'll not only feel more respected, you'll be in a stronger position to bargain, whether at your current workplace or a future one.

Disclaimer: Rachel Kramer Bussell is a freelance writer. The views expressed in this article are not necessarily those of Stash.

By Rachel Kramer Bussell

Stash

How to Get Back in the Job Market After a Long Absence

Partner Content

Below is an article originally written by Kristin Hanes for PowerToFly Partner Stash, and published on October 6, 2017. Go to Stash's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Once you've been out of the job market, it's tough to get back in. Whether you chose to travel, raise your family, or were sidelined due to a layoff, applying for a new role after a long time away can be intimidating.

But if you are thinking about dusting off your resume, now is as good a time as ever to do it.

The economy has recovered from the financial crisis, unemployment is at a multi-decade low, businesses of all kinds are hiring, and wages are increasing.

"Now is an excellent time," said Brandi Britton, district president of OfficeTeam, a company that specializes in staffing. "The employment market is very good right now, and there are a number of opportunities."

The most in-demand jobs she's seeing? Administrative assistants and executive assistants across all industries, as well as customer service professionals.

Here are Britton's tips for job seekers who've been out of work for any period of time.

Brush up on your interviewing skills

You might feel silly doing it, but practicing for your interview will help you nail the job you want.

Britton advises getting a friend or family member to ask common interview questions, many of which can easily be found online. Rehearse those answers extensively, and have your helper throw in a few random questions so you can practice answering on the fly. That way, you'll sound genuine when you're interviewing on the actual day.

Then, once you know who you're interviewing with, do some research. LinkedIn can make it easy to see what an interviewer has been working on and his or her past professional experience.

Tell employers up front that you took time off

It's important to address a large gap in employment up front, but you also don't have to go into great detail about why you haven't been at work. You can say you were out for personal reasons or family matters, and just leave it at that.

Amit Melwani, 30, needed a job after taking two years off to travel around the world with his wife. When he came back to San Francisco, he dove back into the job market in order to find a position similar to his old one in software sales.

"I prepared extensively, researched every company for hours, wrote out answers to 25 interview questions and rehearsed how to deliver my answers," he said. Melwani said he sought out positions at companies where he felt confident he could succeed.

Even though some prospective employers gave him push back about taking so much time off work, he landed a job in San Francisco in about six weeks.

Update your technical skills

In this marketplace, strong talent is hard to find. What will ding you is if you haven't kept your technical skills up to date, Britton says.

"I would recommend that if someone has been out of work for a long time that they take some classes to help them make their technical skills more relevant," Britton says. "These are traditional software programs like Microsoft Word, Outlook, which are the most commonly-used programs companies require at a minimum."

Don't want to spend money on a class? Volunteering can be an ever better option. Employers like to see practical, recent, relevant experience, Britton says. Learning skills at an unpaid job can build experience that can lead to paid work.

Ask for an informational interview

It may feel awkward at first, but asking for an informational phone interview can really help you find a job. Most people are willing to give you 5 to 15 minutes of their time for a quick call about their position and company, Britton says. And it's a great way to network.

"You can contact a manager of a company or department you're interested in and ask them how they got started, what they would suggest you do to get into a company like theirs and back into the workforce," Britton says. People are usually ready to help other people, and it helps the job-seeker understand the company and the job.

Melwani says he was definitely ready to get back into the workforce after traveling, and he has some tips of his own for people ready to find a job.

"If you can show them you're ready to get back to work, are excited, and have polished up your skills, it's a non-issue," he says. Here are some other things he advises: Have a plan of action. Figure out your criteria for the company size, your job role, compensation, and specific industry. Then speak to as many people as you can who can help you out with direction. Prepare for for interviews by rehearsing answers to questions.

"And don't apologize for your time off," Melwani says. "Make it clear you're ready to get back to work."

By Kristin Hanes

Career and Interview Tips

How to Make Money Doing What You Love

Partner Content

A version of this article previously appeared on Skillcrush, an online education program for creatives, thinkers, and makers that gives total tech newbies the tools to make major career changes.

Randle Browning, Skillcrush

"What an inspiring story!" It's something I hear a lot, and not because of my rise to the top of the hip-hop charts.

Just kidding. That didn't happen.

I'm talking about the way readers respond to a blog post I wrote 7 months ago, How Tech Saved My Multi-Passionate Career.

In that post, I spilled on what it felt like to see my creative passions bringing in little to no money while I floundered in a pool of indecision. I had heard about how profitable tech could be, but I was worried about adding yet ANOTHER shiny object to my basket. I was already juggling writing, cooking, and music – why would I add something else to the mix?

But I found a way to put it all together. After taking my very first Skillcrush class, I realized that tech wasn't just another side project. Digital skills supercharged my passions so that I could finally make money doing what I loved. After a few short months of learning to code, I got hired to write (write!) about tech at a company I was ecstatic about (Skillcrush!).

And while I was learning to code, I got paid to build freelance websites, so it didn't cost me a penny.

And here's the secret. I'm no outlier. My success story can be YOUR success story. All you have to do is follow this formula:

Take your passion, add tech skills, and get the career you've only dreamed of.

But if you're like me, being broke isn't even your only concern. Last year, I had no idea which of my passions I wanted to focus on. I was so worried that if I never decided to focus on one thing, I'd be stagnant forever. And I was beating myself up about my indecision.

And that's where the double-whammy comes in. Tech didn't just give me a way to make money off of what I loved – it also gave me focus. Once I had the power to put a few of my dreams into action, it was so much easier to decide WHICH of my passions would get center stage.

If you're in the place I was, the formula sounds too good to be true. If you're like I was, you're completely overcome with negative thoughts and worries.

Do you feel like:

  • you can't find a way to make money doing what you love?
  • you're juggling too many ambitions, and you need FOCUS?
  • you're stuck in an uninspiring job?
  • you take work you dislike just to pay the bills?
  • you daydream about a more fulfilling career?
  • your skills aren't valued on the job market?

Or maybe you know what kind of career you want, but:

  • you live in a place that makes that geographically impossible.
  • you don't know where to start.
  • you can't afford to go back to school.
  • you feel isolated from any kind of learning or networking community.

If ANY of these situations apply to you, tech can help you. Digital skills are the missing ingredient that will make your career really flourish.

And you might be thinking, "Tech? Tech isn't for me. I'm not a computer person – I'm a creative thinker!"

Well I didn't think I was a computer person either. Here's what I didn't know: creative thinkers are amazing at technology, because:

  • Creative people are great at coming up with new ideas.
  • Creative people know how to solve problems in ways no one considered.
  • Creative people aren't afraid to try something completely new.
  • Creative people are pros at imagining the end goal before a project exists.

Even if you never thought of yourself as a "tech person," you can do this. You can be a computer person. You just need to get the skills.

In this guide, I'll walk you through EXACTLY how to add tech to your bag of tricks to get a career you REALLY want. You'll find out:

  • How to pin-point your unique skills and qualities.
  • How to use your background to your advantage, even if it's not tech-related.
  • How to create a career you love, even if you aren't sure what you're passionate about.
  • How to snag a tech career without giving up what you love.

And you'll get:

  • A step-by-step worksheet for discovering a starting point that works for you.
  • A tried and true formula for combining your skillset, your passion, and your new tech skills to create a career and life you love.
  • Real-life examples of people who have done it.

You don't have to settle for a life of working in jobs that leave you tired, bored, and filled with wasted energy and passion. Take it from someone who used to believe there was no way to find meaningful work that still paid the bills.

It's totally possible.

If you learn digital skills, you will be more hireable, and you'll also be more independent. And all those ideas you've got bouncing around in your head? With tech skills, YOU can make them a reality.

You just have to get started.

Wells Fargo Company

Working at Wells Fargo

Meet Sandy Beltran - Head of Enterprise Information Technology

Sandy Beltran, Head of Enterprise Information Technology at Wells Fargo, talks about their robust tech team, and the cutting edge innovation work they're doing in biometrics and artificial intelligence space.

Interested in joining the Wells Fargo team? Click here to see all available roles, and don't forget to press 'Follow' to receive exclusive opportunities and event invitations!

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