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Relativity LLC

"How One Sales Team Became Trusted Advisors to Some of the Largest Legal Divisions"

Below is an article originally written by Adrienne Teeley at Built In Chicago, and published on December 19, 2019. This article is about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Katie Connor stepped into a client meeting with a hunch.

The senior account executive at Relativity was at a large company's legal department to give a demonstration of one of Relativity's products, Legal Hold, which automates the legal hold process for users. She'd spent a good bit of time with this client getting to know their business needs and current roadblocks and, in addition to Legal Hold, suggested the full stack of RelativityOne's products, which could drastically improve the legal department's workflow and provide more accurate data than what they were currently using.

Shortly after the meeting concluded, the client responded that they still wanted to buy Legal Hold — in addition to the entire RelativityOne full stack of products.

Connor didn't rely on sales tricks to get the upsell: She was able to draw on the knowledge she'd gained from months of close communication with the client in order to accurately assess the organization's pain points, then offer solutions that would truly benefit them.

This a-ha moment for a Relativity client wasn't the first (or the last time) this has happened. Connor and her fellow team members are a part of the fastest-growing area of go-to-market focus at Relativity — and they're still growing and hiring. Together, they've been working on developing new, direct commercial relationships with the largest companies in the world. So, being able to master Relativity's sales cycle and advise clients throughout all steps of the process, has been vital to getting clients what they need.

Where some might see obstacles in the process, Relativity's sales team sees benefits.

Katie Connor

Senior Account Executive

"Within the next few years, I'm planning to bring in some top new corporations and work even closer with our development partner community and clients. I'm also excited to learn from all the new talent joining Relativity from other top companies across all of our departments."

Ryan Edwards

Senior Account Executive

"We are all able to reach out to each other for ideas and support when needed, which is one of the things I really like about Relativity's culture. We are invested in each other's success as well as our own."

Todd Tucker

Senior Account Executive

"It's exciting to bring in people from a number of different backgrounds and have all of us learn how to work together to best serve our customers."

relativity's office

No such thing as a 'typical client'

In order to get a full picture of what products would work best for their clients, account executives at Relativity set up discovery meetings, demonstrate the software and talk candidly about the path to implementation.

"Relativity's sale cycle is very detailed-oriented. We look at our clients as partners and really work to understand their needs, wish lists and expectations," Connor said.

The relationship between clients and account executives must be so collaborative in part because the client-type varies widely, said Ryan Edwards, a senior account executive at Relativity. Therefore, the work the software can assist with can be applied to many different industries.

"I'm working with interesting people at small and large, global corporations across manufacturing, biotech, pharma, banking and energy," Edwards said. "I could have had a demo with a financial services and insurance company in New York yesterday, a pitch to an energy company in Houston today and a discovery call with a software company in San Francisco tomorrow."

relativity working together

What does the client care about?

Once a potential client is in talks with Relativity, the first task at hand is to analyze the current solutions they use. From there, the account executives will lay out a roadmap for how RelativityOne products can tackle once-daunting tasks.

"We understand there is a different blueprint for every customer," Connor said. "We're strategic to our approach in selling RelativityOne, and we integrate the solution with the needs of the customer."

Edwards and Connor agreed that due to the diversity in the types of companies that reps work with, being able to solve pain points keeps sales interesting at all stages of the process.

"What's exciting for me is the opportunity to learn what people care about, and how RelativityOne can be meaningful on a personal level," Edwards said. "Will it give the client more time outside of work to spend with their family? Will it help them to level-up their skills and prepare for their next role?"

relativity built in chicago

Letting the numbers speak

After this point, the client generally knows what the product can do — but what they don't know is how it can work for them specifically.

"During the consideration process, the customer will want to test the software, speak with our product, solutions and security teams, and have more detailed conversations around on-boarding and support," Connor said. "I do find clients spending quite a bit of time evaluating RelativityOne and its capabilities."

With any addition to a company's workflow, the decision to buy new software and change up operations isn't one any company makes lightly.

"One of the best things I have found to show customers during this stage is the large, robust community of Relativity users and experts that are out there in the world," said Todd Tucker, a senior account executive at Relativity. "It's the biggest advantage of going with a market leader and is a real strength to our customers."

By the time the client signs a contract, an account executive could have already worked with them for several months, becoming a resource and a support system. "In many cases, if not all, you become a trusted advisor to clients," Edwards said. "I believe the innovations that Relativity drives into the e-discovery industry really matter, and I feel that by selling RelativityOne, I can have a real impact on my corporate clients."

relativity built in chicago offices

After the sale

When Connor left that meeting having just sold the RelativityOne full stack to her clients, it was a personal win, but it was also a win for her client — and their clients as well. With their new software, the time they'd save on combing through documents would be a fraction of what they were used to.

The results speak for themselves: According to Relativity, one of its clients used its software to pinpoint a single Chinese character within hundreds of thousands of WeChat messages, unraveling a two-year embezzlement scheme in a matter of days. Another client, facing growing data volumes, used Relativity to cut processing time by 50 percent. If these figures seem borderline absurd, consider that some of these companies need to sort through literally millions of documents at a time.

In some ways, that's another area where RelativityOne is doing the heavy lifting and allowing account executives to get back to what really matters: forming connections and building a network of support that the client will always have access to.

Responses have been edited for length and clarity. Photography by Allison Williams. Ryan Edwards' photo provided by Relativity.
Savrut Pandya, left, working for the talent acquisition team at Relativity, leads a group of students on an Aug. 2, 2018 tour of the software company's Chicago office. Relativity, which has about 900 workers in its Chicago headquarters, has announced it plans to hire another 200 in 2020. (Chris Walker/Chicago Tribune)
Relativity LLC

"This Chicago tech company hired its 1,000th employee earlier this year. Now, Relativity is set to hire 200 more in 2020."

Below is a Chicago Tribune article originally written by Ally Marotti, a Business Reporter at the Tribune, and published on November 18, 2019. This article is about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Relativity, a Chicago-based software company that has hired about 200 people this year, plans to bring roughly 200 more employees on board in 2020, many of them software engineers.

More than half of the company's 1,100 employees are tech workers and part of Relativity's product and engineering group, CEO Mike Gamson said. The company has about 900 workers in its Chicago headquarters.

"Sometimes you find there are folks who believe you can't find all the engineers you want in Chicago," he said. "We've had really good luck with Chicago being our largest engineering office."

Relativity makes software that legal professionals use to organize data. Gamson said the company's growth is coming as the legal tech industry expands. Relativity also released its first cloud product about two years ago, which allows the company to do more for more customers, he said. Additional employees will help with that transition.

Besides tech employees, Relativity also is looking to hire people for sales, marketing and customer support teams, among others, Gamson said.

Gamson, formerly a senior vice president at LinkedIn, is one of the new employees that joined Relativity this year, taking the helm of the 15-year-old company from founder Andrew Sieja.

Gamson announced the growth plans Monday at the company's Loop headquarters. Mayor Lori Lightfoot joined him and announced that more than 2,000 jobs will be added at Chicago tech companies collectively in 2019 and 2020.

"I want Chicago's tech community to hear me on this issue: We see you as vital and essential partners in Chicago's future," Lightfoot said. "We are eager, ready, willing and able to work with our tech community to be successful."

Relativity's count of 400 new positions in those two years is the highest among the 15 tech companies that participated in Monday's announcement. Others include Cameo, which lets users buy personalized video shoutouts from celebrities, parking platform SpotHero and cannabis marketing platform Fyllo.

Relativity LLC

Relativity is One of Fortune's "55 Best Companies to Work For in Chicago"

Below is part of an article originally published by Fortune on May 21, 2019. This information is about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Information technology, health care, financial services—and a school district. This year's list of best companies to work for in Chicago contains quite a variety of workplaces, from large companies to small and medium-sized companies alike, due to employee feedback analyzed by Fortune research partner Great Place to Work. Take a look at the list below and learn more about the methodology here.

19. Relativity

Industry: Information Technology
U.S. employees: 806
U.S. revenue: Confidential
Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois

Employees say:

"People here are very positive, and when things go wrong, people feel able to openly discuss issues. It's a very encouraging work environment, and I feel inspired to give my best."

Read the Great Place to Work review here.

Relativity LLC

"How e-discovery requirements are changing: 5 questions with Relativity CTO Keith Carlson"

Below is an article originally written by Joyce Wells, editor-in-chief of KMWorld magazine, and published on April 29, 2019. This article is about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Earlier this year, Relativity, a Chicago-based provider of legal software, announced plans to hire 300 people. As part of the expansion, the company named Keith Carlson as its new CTO.

Carlson was most recently general manager of payments and fraud at Amazon Web Services in Seattle, and is now responsible for technology and architecture strategy and oversees engineering delivery, engineering operations, and production engineering functions at Relativity—formerly known as kCura.

In his new role, the company says, he will be integral to maturing Relativity's SaaS delivery model with RelativityOne and expanding Relativity's reach into the unstructured data realm.

Carlson recently shared his views on the value of unstructured data, changing requirements for data privacy, and how the e-discovery space is evolving.

What are some of the approaches or technologies that you hope to plan to implement in your new role at Relativity?

Keith Carlson: As more customers adopt RelativityOne, we will continue to implement more cloud-native services to augment this growth. Thanks to the elastic scaling and storage already built in to our SaaS product, we can really focus on making the whole customer experience the best it can be.

At Amazon Web Services, you developed one of the first cloud fraud prevention and detection organizations and grew it to where it was evaluating 10 trillion pieces of data a day. How does the expertise and skills from that role transfer to the new responsibilities at Relativity?

KC: Building the Fraud Prevention team at AWS taught me the value of unstructured data. During my time there we developed sophisticated real-time analysis models that processed thousands of variables. Over the next decade, I believe that leveraging unstructured data will be a key part of the move to machine learning models, artificial intelligence and deep learning, and I believe that these technologies will impact just about every part of our lives. With the experience Relativity already has in the unstructured data space, I feel like I have been given a front row seat for what's coming. I can't wait to see where it goes and where we will take things.

Why is it important to extend Relativity's reach into the unstructured data realm?

KC: Customers love the extensibility of our platform because it allows them to address the unique needs of their business and clients in e-discovery and beyond. More and more we're beginning to see customers harness the power of our platform to build unique applications to previously-unsolved problems in the unstructured data realm. A great example of this is Deloitte's new Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) application which is built on top of Relativity. The application is used by government agencies to help them manage disclosure requests for government records using automation, analytics and scalable data compliance functionality. Internally, we're also committed to building out unique extensions of Relativity that help grow our business and promote new revenue streams. One area we're really excited about is proactive compliance and how our new Relativity Trace application works with businesses in regulated industries to stop bad behavior like fraud and insider trading before it happens.

How are changing views on data privacy affecting e-discovery solutions?

KC: Data privacy has made its way into regulation around the world and it has impacted how organizations manage data and e-discovery matters across borders. Now more than ever, it is important that users look for a single e-discovery solution with a global footprint, like RelativityOne, that can handle increasingly complex e-discovery matters in a secure and compliant manner.

What are the biggest challenges you see in the e-discovery?

KC: One area that is always top of mind for customers and continues to be a high priority for Relativity is data security, especially in the public cloud. Our goal is to lead the industry to SaaS through RelativityOne and one of the biggest hurdles we've identified is users being unsure around data security in the public cloud. We're confident that we can continue to quell any concerns around this topic by delivering a truly best-in-class security posture developed and implemented by our Calder7 security team and built into every avenue and process of the code that our engineering team develops. I'm looking forward to expanding engineering's partnership with our Calder7 team to ensure that our security remains a best-in-class pillar for our company and for RelativityOne.

Relativity LLC

"Doing it big with data: 7 Chicago companies detail how big data leads to real-world impacts"

Below is an article originally written by Alton Zenon III at Built In, and published on April 26, 2019. The following section of the article is about the team at PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Big data as a general concept is incredibly varied in its use cases and the conclusions it leads to. While it can be helpful in building out a single product, it can also be the basis of an entire business model. And oftentimes, regardless of what industry or purpose the data is used for, the quantitative vastness of a big data info-block is rivaled only by the qualitative minutia of the information presented.

We spoke to data experts at seven Chicago tech companies working with big data to find out just what they're doing with the enormous sets of information they collect and how those efforts translate to tangible things in real life.

Relativity

Relativity simplifies the discovery process during litigations, internal investigations and compliance projects with its cloud-based e-discovery software. Lead System Engineer Corey Wagehoft said the cloud is a key part of how his team leverages big data and keeps up with client demand.

How is your company leveraging big data as part of your product?

My team is primarily responsible for building a common shared compute platform for our development teams. This allows our SaaS product, RelativityOne, to scale to meet increased customer demand automatically. RelativityOne can process massive amounts of data, and we built this platform using widely adopted technologies that have been proven to handle the demand we require. We are also working with very bleeding-edge technology to open new opportunities for the developers building RelativityOne.

We can meet large-scale data demands on a much larger scale in the cloud than running our product in a traditional data center.

What is an example of a real-world impact you've produced using big data?

We can meet large-scale data demands on a much larger scale in the cloud than running our product in a traditional data center. No matter what size of data set that needs processing, we can meet the demand with no interaction necessary from our customers or operations.

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