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Relativity

"Relativity Awards $100,000 Technology Grant to Chicago Public Schools"

Two Early College STEM Schools - Lake View High School and Corliss High School - Each Receive $50,000 Grants to Purchase Tech for Staff and Students

Below is an article originally published by PR Newswire on July 15, 2020. This article is about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

CHICAGO, July 15, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Relativity, a global legal and compliance technology company, announced that it has provided $50,000 grants to two CPS Early College STEM Schools: Lake View High School and Corliss High School. Both high schools have STEM and IT pathways and additional technology for their staff and students will help further their vision and support student success.

"For nearly a decade, Relativity has worked to help close the technology divide that poses challenges to many young people in Chicago. Now more than ever, local students and staff need easy access to technology and related resources as schools must plan for the possibility of continued remote learning as they head into a new school year," said Colleen Costello, Head of Social Impact at Relativity. "For high schools that have STEM and IT pathways, it's especially crucial that these motivated students have the tools and opportunities necessary to maximize their talents."

Located in the Lake View community on Chicago's North Side, Lake View High School serves a diverse student population, most of whom live in low-income households. As an Early College STEM school, Lake View High School offers unique STEM coursework and opportunities for students to earn college credit while they're still in high school. This grant for the school will go toward supplementing the school's existing inventory with updated laptops for educators.

Corliss High School located in the Pullman neighborhood on Chicago's Far South Side also serves a diverse student population and offers unique programming and college coursework through its Early College STEM program. The school will utilize the Relativity grant funds to purchase 200 Chromebooks, as personal technology for the students is imperative during this remote e-learning period and for needs that will arise at the beginning of the 2020-2021 school year. Remaining funds will support a remote learning incentive program as well as the purchase of graphing calculators and flash drives to help students save assignments.

"Access to technology is critical to ensuring students are learning and engaging, especially for our Early College STEM Schools, which have a special focus on science and technology," said CPS Chief Education Officer, LaTanya D. McDade. "Computing devices are the textbooks of today — essential tools that will help our students reach their full potential and enable our educators to teach with innovation and creativity. I want to thank Relativity for their generous contribution." This grant will be distributed through the CPS Foundation, Children First Fund.

Relativity Gives, Relativity's community outreach program, helps Chicago youth — especially those with limited resources — gain access to the technology, equipment and training they need to be successful in today's world. To date, the company has committed $2.92 million in direct financial and in-kind donations to local public schools and non-profits.

About Relativity
At Relativity, we make software to help users organize data, discover the truth, and act on it. Our platform is used by thousands of organizations around the world to manage large volumes of data and quickly identify key issues during litigation, internal investigations, and compliance operations with RelativityOne and our newest offering Relativity Trace. Relativity has over 180,000 users in 40+ countries from organizations including the U.S. Department of Justice, more than 70 Fortune 100 companies, and 198 of the Am Law 200. RelativityOne offers all the functionality of Relativity in a secure and comprehensive SaaS product. Relativity has been named one of Chicago's Top Workplaces by the Chicago Tribune for nine consecutive years. Please contact Relativity at sales@relativity.com or visit http://www.relativity.com for more information.

About Children First Fund: The Chicago Public Schools Foundation:
The Children First Fund is the philanthropic and partnership arm of Chicago Public School (CPS). It serves as a knowledge hub and liaison between CPS and its community of partners, securing and organizing resources that advance CPS' mission to provide a high-quality public education that prepares every child in every neighborhood for success in college, career, and civic life. For more information, please visit https://www.childrenfirstfund.org or find us on social @ChiFirstFund.

Contact
Veronica Spak, Relativity Corporate Communications
Email: PR@relativity.com

SOURCE Relativity

Relativity

"How E-Discovery Software Is Helping Battle COVID-19" - Robert Ambrogi

Below is an article originally written by Robert Ambrogi and published by Above the Law on June 29, 2020. This article includes information about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

The response contrasts with the legal profession's slow pace of adoption of cutting-edge AI technology.

Artificial intelligence software developed to help litigation attorneys get more quickly to the core of a case is now showing promise in helping medical researchers fast-track their inquiries into how to treat COVID-19.

At the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, e-discovery pioneers Maura R. Grossman and Gordon V. Cormack have found a new use for machine-learning technology they developed to help attorneys more quickly sift through large collections of discovery documents — helping medical staff more quickly search massive databases of COVID-related clinical studies.

Meanwhile, data scientists and product managers at e-discovery company Relativity are employing several of their technology tools for the similar purpose of helping medical researchers more quickly review data sets of journal articles and medical literature with the goal of better equipping them to battle COVID-19.

In the Waterloo case, Grossman and Cormack are well known in the e-discovery field for their development of a technology-assisted review tool that uses a continuous active learning protocol. Of the various TAR or predictive coding tools on the market, theirs has been scientifically demonstrated to deliver the best results.

When the coronavirus crisis hit, Grossman, formerly e-discovery counsel at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York and now research professor and director of the Women in Science Program in the school of computer science at Waterloo, and Cormack, professor at the computer science school, had already been dabbling in the use of TAR to research health topics, she told me recently.

They saw a process that had many parallels to law, in that expensive medical researchers were spending large amounts of time reviewing hundreds or thousands of clinical studies, just as expensive lawyers spend large amounts of time reviewing documents in discovery.

Seeing an opportunity to help, they began working with the knowledge synthesis team at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, on behalf of the Canadian Frailty Network and Health Canada, to automate literature searches related to COVID-19.

The goal, as described in an article posted by the computer science school, was to help the team quickly identify clinical studies that have evaluated the effective and safety of various measures to keep nursing facilities safe, as well as treatments for patients with COVID-19.

Using their CAL technology, Grossman and Cormack have been able to help St. Michael's researchers complete in two weeks reviews that would typically take a year or more.

"Searching and finding studies for systematic reviews has traditionally been a time-consuming and laborious process that uses keyword search, followed by manual screening of abstracts, and finally full papers," Grossman said in the article. "We are instead training a machine learning algorithm to perform the initial steps in this task."

Analyzing COVID-19 Data

At e-discovery company Relativity, data scientists and product managers likewise saw a role for their technology and skills in helping in the fight against COVID-19. Recently, I discussed Relativity's response with Rebecca BurWei, senior data scientist; Andrea Beckman, director of product management; and Trish Gleason, product manager.

They were prompted to act after the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy released a massive dataset of COVID-19 medical research and issued a call to action to the tech community to develop text- and data-mining techniques to help scientists use the data to answer high-priority questions about COVID-19.

The tech community was encouraged to submit tools through Kaggle, a machine learning and data science community owned by Google Cloud, so that the tools would be openly available for researchers anywhere in the world. Kaggle sweetened the request with a $1,000 award for the tool that best met the project criteria.

Relativity responded using its existing AI and text-mining tools. Specifically, it offered four ways in which its technology could assist in facilitating the review of the data:

Elimination of duplicates. Deduplication is a task familiar to any e-discovery attorney, eliminating duplicate and redundant copies of email messages and other documents, in order to enhance the effectiveness of the AI software. When Relativity staff learned from the Kaggle forum that the COVID-19 researchers were seeing the same articles come up repeatedly, they saw a role for their deduplication technology. Using Relativity's Textual Near Duplicates and Repeated Content Identification tools, they reviewed the dataset and identified over 4,000 duplicate articles and a handful of commonly repeated phrases.

Tagging studies by language. Because the dataset included literature from throughout the world, articles were in many languages. Relativity used its Language Identification tool, which can identify text from 100 languages, and was able to tag over 52,000 COVID-19 journal articles by the language in which they were written. Relativity provided this language-tagged dataset to the Kaggle community, earning praise from a Kaggle community leader for having created a "great dataset."

Better keyword search of risk factors. Relativity's Conceptual Analytics uses a machine learning methodology called latent semantic analysis to extract insights and patterns from document data. Based on this technology, Relativity used keyword expansion to find concepts related to cancer and chronic respiratory diseases as risk factors for COVID-19. With those concepts, it was able to find 98 relevant journal articles that would otherwise have been missed.

Identifying pediatric patients. A goal of the Kaggle community's AI-powered literature review was to auto-fill summaries of COVID-19 journal articles, so that public health experts could decide quickly whether they needed to read the full article. Relativity contributed to this project by identifying and summarizing Spanish journal articles that involved asymptomatic pediatric patients.

Relativity's data scientists first used regular expression searches to filter down to a small number of relevant articles, then they experimented with new AI techniques not currently available in the e-discovery product, such as modern vectorizers and question-answer techniques, to automatically extract the ages of the study participants.

Rewarding Use Of Tech

For Grossman and Cormack at Waterloo and the product team at Relativity, using their e-discovery skills to help with COVID-19 research has been rewarding.

"What was most rewarding for me was the community angle and being able to help out during this crisis," said Relativity's Andrea Beckman. "We have a strong community in e-discovery, but here we got to join a different group and be part of everybody coming together in tackling a critical challenge."

Grossman drew a contrast with the legal profession's slow pace of adoption of cutting-edge AI technology such as TAR, due in part to its fear of losing the billable hour.

"Here we're in an area where the incentives are exactly the opposite, where there is receptiveness to something that will cut time and cut costs," she said. "It's refreshing to work in an area where the reception capacity and adoption rate is very different."

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Robert Ambrogi is a Massachusetts lawyer and journalist who has been covering legal technology and the web for more than 20 years, primarily through his blog LawSites.com. Former editor-in-chief of several legal newspapers, he is a fellow of the College of Law Practice Management and an inaugural Fastcase 50 honoree. He can be reached by email at ambrogi@gmail.com, and you can follow him on Twitter (@BobAmbrogi).

Relativity

"Weekly Refresh: Relativity Awards Grant to CPS"

Below is part of an article originally written by Tatum Hunter at Built In Chicago, and published on September 3, 2019. This part of the article is about PowerToFly Partner Relativity. Go to Relativity's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

Relativity awarded $250K to Sandoval Elementary. Sandoval is a dual-language school that serves 900 students in Chicago's Gage Park neighborhood. The Wired to Learn grant, awarded over three years, will go toward new technologies, school labs and teacher training. Previous recipients of Relativity's educational grants have reported better attendance, test scores and student engagement. [Press Release]