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AAA

Women Empower Resource List

Below you can find a list of useful resources curated from the PowerToFly platform especially for the Women Empower group at AAA.

Working from home

Diversity & Allyship

Health & Wellness

Leadership


Feel free to check out all of our previously-recorded and upcoming live programming HERE

Raytheon Technologies

How women can rise in tech

RI&S top engineers offer career advice in virtual workshops

Below is an article originally written by Raytheon Intelligence and Space, a PowerToFly Partner. Go to Raytheon Technologies on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more. The picture above features Claudeliah Roze, RI&S technical director, Mission Modernization and Solutions, working on a Raytheon Technologies-built drone manufactured in the company's Indianapolis facility. Roze is active as a volunteer for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math education as well as serving as a mentor to women engineers new to the workforce.

Only 11% of executive positions in Silicon Valley are held by women, according to a 2019 Harvard Law School study. This gender disparity across the industry is one of the reasons why employees at Raytheon Intelligence & Space, one of the four businesses that form Raytheon Technologies, participate in the Women Impact Tech event series.

Its mission: "To provide a platform of professional growth for women in tech by connecting companies dedicated to diversity, inclusion, and female leadership with the top female technologists in the country."

Their event series brings together top female engineers to engage in discussions around what they are doing — and what they can be doing — to impact the future of women in tech. Two Raytheon Intelligence & Space engineers participated in virtual WIT panels, June 8-12, 2020, to share their experiences as female leaders in engineering.

Claudeliah Roze, RI&S technical director, Mission Modernization and Solutions, spoke on a panel titled "Ways Tech is Changing the World in 2020." Roze spoke about how Raytheon Technologies plays a key role in the Global Positioning System, and how GPS impacts society in ways people don't know about it.

"Many of us think of GPS as a way to find the latest and greatest restaurant; however, it's used in medical equipment for critical and precise timing as well as by our first responders, trying to locate injured or very sick people," she said.

Roze said she went into engineering not only for the challenge, but also the opportunity to improve people's everyday lives.

"One of the things that I tell people that I mentor is that when you're constructing your engineering career and you're figuring out what you want to do, you have a responsibility as an engineer to also think of the human side of it," she said "How can I take technology to make life safer and better for the everyday person? I tell them to keep in mind our civic responsibility as citizens of this great world."

Affecting change and influencing the paths of future engineers is also what drew in Kate Maxwell, RI&S director, Engineering Transformation Strategy. Maxwell spoke on a WIT panel about "The Courage to Lead: Inner Dimensions of Culturally Conscious Leadership."

The session focused on the importance of diversity and inclusion; how critical it is to actively listen to each other; and why courageous leadership is necessary to eradicate systemic racism.

"What companies are starting to realize is that if their employees bring their authentic selves to work, and be able to show up as who they are, without having to carry that mental load of trying to conform to a different standard, or trying to hide some part of them, that's really where you get that diversity of thought," Maxwell said. "That's when people start to become more innovative, and you can start to create new products and capabilities and disrupt your business itself, which is a really positive thing. We know the top performing businesses are the ones that put a lot of emphasis on diversity and inclusion."

Her advice to the attendees focused on the importance of diverse perspectives, allyship and creating a safe space where employees can bring their authentic selves to work.

"Have the difficult conversations and lead with empathy and compassion," Maxwell said. "Recognize that you might not have the right words, but it is better to have these tough conversations than to be silent. Be an active ally.

"And on the career front, lean into the discomfort and the fear. Raise your hand for the hard things. It will help you to grow," she said. "Do not discount the value of mentors and champions. Cast a wide net and remember to pay it forward as you grow your career."

And these discussions did not stop at the end of the panels. Our RI&S panelists have continued to receive feedback from attendees via email and have broadened their apertures as a result.

And Maxwell even picked up a new mentee — her panel moderator.

Moving forward, both women agree: never be afraid to have the uncomfortable conversations. In the words of one panel attendee, "What a crucial time to have this discussion."

"Especially in times of world-impacting events like we're experiencing now, we need to be able to bring our full selves to work. So open those dialogues and be active listeners," Roze said. "Without them, we won't get to much of a solution."

To learn more, you can listen to their panels on demand:

Five Ways Tech is Changing the World in 2020

The Courage to Lead: Inner Dimensions of Culturally Conscious Leadership

Raytheon Technologies

Relaunch your career at Raytheon Technologies

• Unique opportunity for experienced professionals seeking to return to work after taking a 2+ year career break

• Comprehensive 14-week paid program w/benefits

• Offers resources, networking and personalized development plans

• Provides leadership exposure, professional development, mentorship and coaching

• Eligible for consideration for a full-time role at the end of the program

Bring your knowledge, experience and creativity back to the workforce through exciting and challenging opportunities. Our next cohort will run from September 21, 2020 – December 23, 2020.

Resumés must be submitted by July 31, 2020 for the Fall 2020 Cohort.

For more information on the RTX Re-Empower Program and view available opportunities, visit:

https://www.rtx.com/careers/re-empower

If you don't see a specific position of interest, please submit your resume for consideration via the following link:

Relaunch your Career at Raytheon Technologies

Snap Inc.

The Snapchat Generation and the Road to Recovery

"Join Savannah Sellers, host of "Stay Tuned" from NBC News, and a pre-recorded panel of tastemakers and Snap experts as they discuss the Snapchat Generation and how to move forward in a COVID-19 world."

Procore Technologies, Inc.

To Future Female Engineers

Below is an article originally written by Ani Abrahamian, SVP Engineering at Procore. Go to Procore's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

The stereotypical male coder facade has been, slowly, fading away for some time now. And yet, despite this arduous climb, STEM is still heavily male-dominated. In fact, only 26% of computing-related jobs are held by women, and in most companies, the ratio of men to women in engineering is 5:1. Women in tech have overcome obstacles such as a lack of role models and isolation to be where they are. They have proven their mettle long before arriving at your company.

In commemoration of International Women in Engineering Day, we reached out to six female engineers at Procore to compile some of their experiences working in tech, and share advice and ideas for how we can shape a better future for those who are planning to pursue careers in STEM – science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

To the future female engineers of tomorrow—we welcome you to the Women in Technology (WIT) community. The journey ahead of you might often feel lonely. It will take courage and tenacity to aim high, but you are not doing this alone and we want to help inspire you to persevere in your professional endeavors.

Find resilience through rejection

"Landing your first full-time job will likely be one of the biggest obstacles you will face in your career. Don't be discouraged by the rejection you may experience upfront. Instead, learn from every interview and coding challenge. Persevere knowing this is your passion, this is something you're really good at, and this is what you're meant to do." – Sam Holmes, Senior Software Engineer

Believe in your ability to succeed

"Your own personal growth is not a competition with others' personal growth." – Crystal Ophaso, Senior QA Engineer

"There will always be someone who knows more than you and there's always more to learn. Don't let that dull the progress you've made. The skills you bring to the table speak more than anything else." – Kaitlin Jaffe, Senior Software Engineer

Don't be afraid to make mistakes and take risks

"Take on that ticket that intimidates you. Take on a leadership role (no matter how small). That's how you learn and grow." – Sam Holmes, Senior Software Engineer

"It's okay to fail sometimes or ask a "stupid" question." – Crystal Ophaso, Senior QA Engineer

"Don't equate not knowing an answer with feeling like you don't belong. You are not inadequate. You are well equipped to do the job." – Rachel Arkebauer, Senior Site Reliability Engineer

"No problem is unsolvable if you take the time to learn it." – Michelle Mei Ling Waldorf, Software Engineering Manager

Build a strong support system

"Find supportive leadership and mentorship to help set you up for success. Having someone give you challenging, meaningful projects and then advocate for you and your work is invaluable." – Rachel Arkebauer, Senior Site Reliability Engineer

"Find a friend who knows programming or a meetup to go to and just ask for help when you are stuck. Most people are happy to help out when asked." – Kaitlin Jaffe, Senior Software Engineer

"Lean on your family for support, mentorship, and stability." – Ripple Goyal, Principal Software Engineer, Data and Analytics

Embrace change without resistance

"Technology is changing more rapidly than ever and you need to adapt to change as easily as possible. So if a new tech stack looks promising, then just jump right in and try it out!" – Michelle Mei Ling Waldorf, Software Engineering Manager

Take initiative

"Ask for a raise. Ask for a promotion. Ask for a job transfer. All of those things can profoundly impact your life—the worst they can say is no." – Crystal Ophaso, Senior QA Engineer

Give and be receptive to feedback

"Feedback will help challenge the way you think about and design code. It will propel your career forward insurmountably." – Sam Holmes, Senior Software Engineer

"Know when to take a step back and listen to/learn from others. Being able to share experiences and perspectives is a powerful learning opportunity." – Rachel Arkebauer, Senior Site Reliability Engineer

Be a Groundbreaker

"Forge your own path on what being a woman engineer looks like." – Kaitlin Jaffe, Senior Software Engineer

"Don't be intimidated by organizations and teams that heavily skew male. There's a notorious lack of diversity in tech. Use your position to have uncomfortable discussions and help pave the way for underrepresented groups." – Rachel Arkebauer, Senior Site Reliability Engineer

"Open the doors of opportunity and set up others with a support system to keep them on the path to success. Talk to them through the periods of self-doubt and uncertainty so that they can enjoy the eventual success of becoming a professional Engineer. Make the time to assist coworkers so that their work shines and offer encouraging words so that they can gain or maintain a positive perspective on their work." – Michelle Mei Ling Waldorf, Software Engineering Manager

"Help attract the younger generation by showing them the amazing possibilities technology brings. Start a dialog or safe space to break the ceiling and biases." – Ripple Goyal, Principal Software Engineer, Data and Analytics

Lastly, never let gender play a role in making a decision in any aspect of your life

"There is no difference in how you work vs how your male colleagues work. You are able to perform just as efficiently as any of your male colleagues. Be confident in yourself and understand your worth. You can do anything and be anyone you want." – Sam Holmes, Senior Software Engineer

"If you don't enjoy what you do, you will not be good at it. Choose what makes you happy and bring that creativity in your work whether it is in technology or something else." – Ripple Goyal, Principal Software Engineer, Data and Analytics

We hope the advice and experience shared here will be helpful to all current and future female engineers, and welcome additional ideas and thoughts that can be added to this post in the Comments section.Please feel free to share.

Procore is currently expanding our Engineering teams, and we'd like to hear from you! Please apply here.

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