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Career and Interview Tips

Four Reasons Every Female Developer Should Attend A Hackathon

Even for a seasoned computer programmer, hackathons can be an amazing opportunity to learn, network, and think outside the box. Success stories like GroupMe and the Facebook "Like" button (both of which came from humble hackathon beginnings) may feel unattainable to the average engineer, but that's half the fun! You never know what your team will come up with in the collaborative, fast-paced, rule-bending hackathon environment.

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Career and Interview Tips

Learning Code In Los Angeles? These Places Have You Covered

The Los Angeles tech scene is not to be underestimated. Google, Yahoo!, Facebook, Snapchat, BuzzFeed, and dozens of other tech companies have offices in LA — often located in the Westside’s Silicon Beach region.

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Career and Interview Tips

6 Tips For Acing Any Job Interview

“When a hot dog expands, in which direction does it split and why?" “Would you rather fight one horse-sized duck, or 100 duck-sized horses?" “If you're the CEO, what are the first three things you check about the business when you wake up?"

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Why You Shouldn’t Judge A Developer By How Many Lines Of Code She Pushes

For people who aren't familiar with software development, it can be easy to assume that all developers work in the same way. After all, estimations of a task's difficulty (whether you're using days, points, or some other metric) leave little room for distinction between developers. There are junior, senior, and lead engineers, but what about good and bad engineers, and the differences of productivity and quality between them?

Former software developer Piet Hadermann takes on this topic in his blog post "Your Developers Aren't Bricklayers, They're Writers." A good developer, he explains, is not difficult to define: it's someone who writes well, logically, and with very few bugs. According to Robert Glass, author of "Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering," these good developers can be up to 28 times better than bad developers. How is that even possible? It's simple: better code leads to less pressure on managers and other developers, fewer unexpected bugs, a more reliable product, and a stronger, more productive team.

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