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White Men Feel Excluded From D&I — Is That A Problem?

Ironic as it may sound, a new study has found that white men are feeling left out when it comes to diversity and inclusion.


While you could chalk this up to white fragility/fragile masculinity and leave it at that, it would be counterproductive. As the study points out, white men hold 40% of leadership positions at companies; without their support, D&I initiatives are less likely to succeed and the burden for change is placed unfairly on women and people of color.

To that end, the White Men's Leadership Study set out to analyze and improve the effectiveness of white men as they integrate D&I initiatives into their leadership work. The study was spearheaded by White Men Full Diversity Partners, which explains, "When companies engage white males alongside their peers from different backgrounds, marginalized groups are freed from the exhausting work of coaching white men to understand their world. Most white men want to help. They just don't know how."

As Diversity & Inclusion Consultant Lily Zheng states in her recent Harvard Business Review article reviewing the study, "The single biggest challenge to engaging in D&I efforts — as noted by almost 70% of white men surveyed — is knowing whether they are 'wanted.'"

Study participants' responded to the question, "When white men in your company find it difficult to lead through diversity, their difficulty is due to..."

WMLS Executive Summary


Read a summary of the findings here and tell us what you think in the comments:

  • How can white men be allies to D&I efforts?
  • And who should be responsible–if anyone–for convincing them that it's a dialogue they need to participate in?
Quip

9 Tips for Hosting a Successful, Collaborative Hackathon, from Quip

A company that is built around offering modern collaboration software needs to believe in the power of bringing people together.

Luckily, that's just what Quip is all about.

Their annual three-day hackathon Quiprupt is an example of what collaboration looks like not just as a product offering but also as a core tenet of company culture. We asked participants from Quiprupt 2021 to tell us about their experience coming together to ship cool stuff—and how Quip's culture sets them up to be able to find meaningful work while building better products.

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Career Advice

Fostering Collaboration and Innovation in a Fast-Paced Environment

Insight from YouGov's Victoria Ganusceac

Victoria Ganusceac knew she wanted to be a product manager, but the HR manager at the company where she was working at the time wasn't on board.

Not immediately, anyways.

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How I Took Action Against Anti-Asian Racism– At Work and In My Personal Life

If you've been paying attention to the news recently, you likely have noticed a sharp rise in Anti-Asian racism. Members of the Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities have been vocal in bringing awareness to the heightened racial discrimination they have faced since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, which, in some cases, have had tragic consequences.

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popular

20 Lessons from 66 Working Moms Balancing Family and Career

Experience is the greatest teacher, and the experience of being a mom is particularly chock-full of learning opportunities.

We know from the examples set by our coworkers and friends just how good moms are at juggling competing responsibilities and priorities. ("If you want to make sure something gets done, give it to a busy person" would be even more accurate if it was changed to "give it to a working mom.")

So this Mother's Day, we decided to ask working moms at our partner companies about the secret sauce that connects parenting experience to being better and happier at work.

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