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Diversity & Inclusion

The Modern Workplace Was Built for White Men— If We Don't Diversify the Brains Behind AI, The Future of Work Will Be Built for Them Too

Making AI Work for Everyone

Most experts agree that AI will revolutionize the workplace. What's less clear is whether it will be for better or worse.


Many of these same experts argue that although machine learning will automate many tasks currently done by humans, it will also create a number of new roles.

But if AI is really going to do more good than harm, we need to diversify the brains behind it.

As Artificial Intelligence Reporter Karen Hao explains, the AI industry has a severe lack of diversity:

  • "Women account for only 18% of authors at leading AI conferences, 20% of AI professorships, and 15% and 10% of research staff at Facebook and Google, respectively.
  • Racial diversity is even worse: black workers represent only 2.5% of Google's entire workforce and 4% of Facebook's and Microsoft's."

Why does this matter? We know all too well how technology designed by and for one small group can end up hurting the rest of us.

As Hao points out, AI has already succumb to several of its creators biases:

We should be using AI to build a better and more inclusive workplace, not to further enshrine the biases of the white men who have the privilege of creating it.

Curious about the world we could create with more diverse minds shaping the future of AI?

  • Join us FRIDAY. 9/27 to learn how you can use AI for good at work. Just educating yourself about AI and its potential is a great first step in ensuring it's used fairly (even if you're not going to make a career pivot into machine learning anytime soon).

Click Below To Sign Up

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Preparing for the Unexpected: ​How Maria Fava Found Her Confidence as a Bicultural, Bilingual Woman at T. Rowe Price

Born in Mexico City and raised in Guadalajara, Maria Fava never would have predicted that she'd have a career in financial services. And certainly not in Maryland.

Over two decades ago, when Maria moved to the U.S. to study psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington, she'd planned on moving back to Mexico to study law after graduation. Instead, she fell in love with an unassuming Italian-American her senior year. She married him and moved to Maryland, his home state.

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For Employers

How Leaders Can Support Their Black Employees

A five-step framework for addressing systematic racism at work

The world has changed in the past few weeks.

We're watching corporations and organizations across the world come out in support of Black lives in droves. Many of those organizations are doing so for the first time in their history.

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Applying & Interviewing at Surescripts — Technical Recruiter Michelle Baker Shares Her Tips

Meet Michelle Baker, a technical recruiter at Surescripts. She shared her top tips for applying to Surescripts.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the company's interview process, culture, and values, and learn how you can best prepare for interviews!

To learn more about Surescripts and their open roles, click here.

Career Advice

How Viasat’s Jasmine Harvey Architects Her Own Career

Jasmine Harvey is pursuing her MBA while working full-time as a buyer for Viasat, a global communications and satellite internet company. Balancing home, work, and school while maintaining a 3.9 grade point average has been quite a challenge. Jasmine had a perfect 4.0 until she took one of the hardest classes in her program, Managerial Economics and Global, during this COVID pandemic. She finished a full 15 percentage points above the class average, but was still 0.6 points away from an "A".

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