GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY
By signing up you accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy
BROWSE CATEGORIES
GET EMAIL UPDATES FROM POWERTOFLY

Why You Shouldn’t Judge A Developer By How Many Lines Of Code She Pushes

For people who aren't familiar with software development, it can be easy to assume that all developers work in the same way. After all, estimations of a task's difficulty (whether you're using days, points, or some other metric) leave little room for distinction between developers. There are junior, senior, and lead engineers, but what about good and bad engineers, and the differences of productivity and quality between them?

Former software developer Piet Hadermann takes on this topic in his blog post "Your Developers Aren't Bricklayers, They're Writers." A good developer, he explains, is not difficult to define: it's someone who writes well, logically, and with very few bugs. According to Robert Glass, author of "Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering," these good developers can be up to 28 times better than bad developers. How is that even possible? It's simple: better code leads to less pressure on managers and other developers, fewer unexpected bugs, a more reliable product, and a stronger, more productive team.

In contrast, bad developers, can make the coding process way more complex. Not only do they write bad code, Piet says, they spend too much time on illogical code that's difficult to maintain and is riddled with bugs. A single QA cycle with bad code can take weeks and result in an abundance of new bugs. Two or three QA cycles later, the release is late, other departments are unhappy, and the team's productivity has already suffered greatly. When you take this bigger picture into account, it's not hard to see how the quality of a developer can have such a profound effect on an entire team.

Making a distinction between good and bad developers isn't about pointing fingers or shaming certain people. It's about making sure that good developers are celebrated, rewarded, and fairly compensated for the quality of their work. It's also about helping non-engineers understand that every developer is different, every team is different, and trying to force standardization between them can often do more harm than good.

People who don't understand software development often think of it like factory work — as long as you churn out "X" lines of code each day, you're worth "Y" salary. But this simplistic view ignores the differences between how individuals work, and the quality of work they complete. In order to foster a cohesive, productive work environment, it's imperative that non-engineers begin to better understand this concept.

To read more about Piet's experiences with measuring developer productivity, check out his original blog post here.

popular

How These Companies Are Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

According to a recent study, anti-Asian hate crimes have risen 150% since the pandemic started. But these acts of violence are not new — they are part of a much larger history of anti-Asian racism and violence in the U.S.

That makes celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (which was named a month-long celebration in May by Congress in 1992 "to coincide with two important milestones in Asian/Pacific American history: the arrival in the United States of the first Japanese immigrants on May 7, 1843 and contributions of Chinese workers to the building of the transcontinental railroad, completed May 10, 1869") this year all the more important.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Lattice

[VIDEO ▶️ ] 3 Tips to Develop a Growth Mindset at Work

💎 Looking to boost your career growth? Tune in to catch 3 top tips to develop a growth mindset at work!

📼 Press PLAY to hear tips from Haley Wolf, Manager of the Sales Development team at Lattice. These 3 tips that she's learned throughout her own career, as well as her experience with colleagues, will help you develop a growth mindset at work.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Facebook, Inc.

How to Approach Career Development in a Remote Environment: Insight from Facebook’s Syamla Bandla

Most people have one home town. Syamla Bandla has 13.

With a father serving in the Indian army, Syamla got used to adapting to a new environment every time his role changed and her family moved to a new city.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Diversity & Inclusion

How This Analyst Learned to Serve — and Lead — at NGA

Anne Do was recently visiting her cousin in San Francisco, California, for less than 48 hours. In that time, she made two cakes and a dozen French macarons.

"I told my family, 'You won't be seeing me for a while!' and packed up what I could for their freezer," says Anne, smiling.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
Procore Technologies Inc

[VIDEO ▶️ ] Diversity at Work: Procore’s Approach

💎 What does a recruiting process with "diversity at work" in mind look like?

📼 Press PLAY to hear some insights from a recruiter at Procore into what it's like to work at a company that encourages diversity. Cynthia Griffin, Senior Talent Operations Specialist at Procore, shares some tips and tricks to stand out in the recruitment process at Procore.

READ MORE AND DISCUSS Show less
© Rebelmouse 2020