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CardFlight

4 Years And Counting: What It’s Like Working At CardFlight

Below is an article originally written by Pearlene Loh, a Marketing Associate at PowerToFly Partner CardFlight, and published on November 16, 2017. Go to CardFlight's page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.

CardFlight is almost 5! As we hit that big milestone, we'd like to shed some light on what it's like being a part of the family, and invite you along for the ride. The CardFlight team is made up of a truly diverse bunch, with different people working on different things in many different ways. Beneath it all, we're a family of innovators, builders, and problem solvers who are driven to make payments easy and delight our customers.

We sat down with Natalia Leonardis, our Director of Business Development, who has been with the team since the early days to "get behind the scenes" at CardFlight.

What made you join CardFlight?

Natalia: I understood the complexity of mobile payments based on my previous job experience and was drawn to the idea that CardFlight aimed to simplify it in addition to enabling merchants to accept payments. Personally, I wanted to break out of my comfort zone and be a part of a team that made changing the payments industry one of its missions.

How long have you been at CardFlight?

Natalia: It has been 4 years, although my first day seemed like it was only yesterday. When I joined CardFlight in 2013, we were really small and were working out of a tiny room in a co-working space. We had 0 clients but a team that was ready to bring innovation to payments. Fast forward to today, we are serving over tens of thousands of merchants in all 50 states. It has been thrilling to be a part of CardFlight's growth.

What was your first day at CardFlight like?

Natalia: Prior to joining CardFlight, I never had any experience working at a startup and was completely clueless as to how I should dress. One would have assumed that the appropriate dress code for a payments and financial technology company would be a dress suit, right? So, I turned up in a dress suit and realized I couldn't have been more wrong. Turns out wearing sweatpants to work is acceptable.

In terms of hardware tools and gadgets, I love the fact that CardFlight provides us with all the micro efficiencies. Sitting on my desk was a sleek new Macbook (my preferred choice), swag, and tools that made my life easier. Beyond hardware, there was a fully stocked pantry with free snacks, unlike the ones in vending machines which only get dispensed when you put your quarters in. The provision of these micro efficiencies definitely played a significant role in macro efficiency.

In addition to providing all the tools to help productivity, CardFlight actually cares about everyone's wellbeing and have team outings frequently. The team brought me out for lunch on my first day and I was under the impression that it was one off, but I soon realized that CardFlight does team lunches every week. Each team member takes turns on picking where to order from that week and gets to talk about whatever they want (think show and tell for adults). Needless to say, that made me look forward to coming into the office even more.

What were some of the biggest adjustments that you had to make going from corporate to a startup like CardFlight?

Natalia: The flat hierarchy a startup offers was a pleasant surprise. We have a very open culture and for the first time I felt empowered to run with my ideas or voice my opinions freely without having to seek validation or approval. CardFlight prides itself on fostering an open and creative office environment, everyone here has the freedom to provide input and feedback into projects at hand. Everyone is given the opportunity to take ownership of their projects and make them better, which is very different from a top down corporate structure.

The liberal vacation policy was also a whole new concept to me. At CardFlight, my performance is measured based on my output and not on how many hours I spend sitting at my desk. This was really refreshing and also enabled to me to pursue growth in other areas. I was happier and worked even harder. Surprisingly, I'm more productive even though I'm spending less time at my desk.

As the first member of the sales team, I had many opportunities to try new things and wear different hats. I got to make judgement calls and problem solve. There wasn't a predefined path that I was expected to take. I had the freedom to try, and the opportunity to fail. Because CardFlight allows us to learn from our mistakes, it has created a culture of fearless, innovative thinkers. I believe this is one of the reasons why we are where we are today.

If you like what you have just read and think you'll make a great addition to the CardFlight team, check out our PowerToFly page to see our open vacancies.

popular

The Best High-Paying Remote Jobs

5 full-time work-from-home roles that pay seriously well

We—we being the internet in general, as well as PowerToFly specifically—often talk about remote work as this glorious thing: you can find professional fulfillment, friendly co-workers, and career growth potential from the comfort of your own home. All while collecting a check!

But where should you look if you want that check to be as big as possible?

Start with this guide to the best high-paying remote jobs. These career choices (and the example companies hiring for them) don't skimp out on paying remote workers well, and you'll still get all the work-from-home flexibility you're looking for. I've linked to specific job posts for each category below, but also look through the 300+ remote jobs on PowerToFly's always-updated remote job board for more.

As you apply and interview, keep these work-from-home interview questions in mind. If you find yourself with a salary offer that's good, but not quite as good as it could be, reference these salary negotiation tips for remote workers to advocate for what you deserve. And when you get the job with a great salary, make sure your home office is set up for success. And then send me a note to tell me how you're doing!

1. Senior Software Engineer

Business woman using laptop

Who It's Good For: Anyone who's a pro in programming languages (Java, Javascript, C++, Python, and SQL, to start, among others) and knows how to drive the development of products. If you like complex engineering challenges, have experience working with different systems and products, and have the discipline to program without a PM physically hovering over you (Slack hovering's allowed, though), this is for you.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Sr. Principal Software Engineer at Dell, Senior Front End Software Engineer at Plectica, Senior Software Engineer at CloudBees

Why You Can Do It Remotely: Like most heads-down-and-create work, developing software and programming are best done with minimal distractions. You'll collaborate with your team for check-ins and bug fixes, but you'll be able to focus on your project work from a home office.

Average Annual Salary: $131,875

2. User Experience Researcher Manager

Young adult woman working with laptop at mobile app

Who It's Good For: Proven researchers who know how to understand the behaviors and motivations of customers through feedback and observation, who have experience synthesizing insights into a brand story, and who have managed teams.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Senior Research Operations Program Manager at Zapier.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: As UX researcher Lindsey Redinger explains in her helpful Medium post, remote research allows companies to reach users all over the world, not just within driving distance to their headquarters, and can be cheaper for companies and easier for participants.

Average Annual Salary: $105,810

3. Senior Product Designer

Female graphic designer smiling at desk in office

Who It's Good For: Creatives with technical chops who like the challenges of evolving and improving the production of current products, leading designers, and collaborating with other parts of the business.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Senior Product Designer at SeatGeek.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: While design teams definitely need to share lots of feedback, there's technology out there to make that easy. The Help Scout design team has shared their favorite tools and tricks to collaborate remotely, which includes recording daily videos of new designs to explain features and ideas in a way a photo file just can't express. (They're also hiring! Check out open Help Scout jobs here).

Average Annual Salary: $107,555

4. Senior Security Analyst

Developing Concentrated programmer reading computer codes Development Website design and coding technologies.

Who It's Good For: Thoughtful, vigilant thinkers who enjoy identifying and fixing gaps in a company's security posture, including through ethnical hacking (hacking a company's system before outsiders can, and addressing the weak points found) and incident response (containing the negative effects of a system breach or attack).

Sound Like You? Check Out: Data Protection Security Analyst at Deloitte.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: Not all security analyst positions are remote-friendly; sometimes they require working with very sensitive data that can be compromised if taken off-site or accessed from a VPN. But with the right data processing policies—like using a privacy filter over your laptop, only using secured wifi, and encrypting your data, all suggested by WebARX security's all-remote team—remote work as a security analyst is definitely possible.

Average Annual Salary: $108,463

5. Technical Project Manager

A strong wifi connection makes for a strong relationship

Who It's Good For: Tech-friendly jack-of-all-trades with a sweet spot for spreadsheets and other organization tools.

Sound Like You? Check Out: Technical Project Manager at Avaaz.

Why You Can Do It Remotely: Project management can sometimes be like herding cats, but you don't need to be in the same room as your feline team members in order to direct them around. With collaborative software (and a highly organized home office, like PM pro Patrice Embry recommends), you can PM the most complicated of projects from wherever you're located.

Average Annual Salary: $95,129

Other Industries

Other high-paying remote-friendly jobs include certain roles in healthcare (like nurse practitioners and psychologists, who can check in with patients via video conferencing and phone calls), app developers for both iOS and Android products, actuaries and tax accountants, and data scientists.

And remember that even jobs that don't seem remote-friendly at first, could possibly be done from home or on the road. If you find a well-paying, exciting job that doesn't offer remote work immediately, it might be worth negotiating a more flexible schedule with a 1-2 day work-from-home option. Both you and the company can see what remote work actually looks like in action, and if it goes well, you can make a pitch to transition to remote work full time.

Other resources you may want to check out in your quest for meaningful, well-paid remote work:

6 Programs You Should Download Right Now if You Work Remotely

Productivity Tips for Remote Workers

Home Office Design Tips for Remote Workers

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Build Your Network at the Next PowerToFly Event

Today we celebrate our partnership with Braintree! Check out this video to see highlights from our recent networking event.

If you missed the event, fear not! Stay connected by following Braintree on PowerToFly and email us at Hi@PowerToFly.com for future events near you.

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